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Staind Glass Look On Plexi Glass?


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#1 jason

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Posted 21 August 2005 - 01:05 PM

i am a set designer for a haunted house attraction and i was looking for tips of any that would help with my designing a staind glass look on a piece of clear plexi glass.

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#2 Chantal

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Posted 21 August 2005 - 03:36 PM

I think the trick would be to find a way to give your surface some textures.

You can find some examples here:

Spectrum Glass Stock List

The have Waterglass, crackle glass, artiqque, and baroque.

Also, try not to use a flat color, but mix in similar tints.

#3 malkore

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 08:48 AM

I've done this before. Head to a craft store, and look for something called Gallery Glass. Its basically a thick kind of paint that dries into a flexible plastic. They make 'liquid lead' that you use first to draw the lead came onto the plexi. After that dries you just fill in with the colors. You can make textures using toothpicks to draw wavy patterns. You can also marbelize using 2-3 colors and a toothpick to swirl them.

Here's the website from the manufacturer: http://www.plaidonline.com/apGG.asp

Its pretty easy stuff to work with. YOu can remove it afterwards with a razor blade. On glass, it would peel off, but on plexi, it bond a little more thoroughly to the pourous surface of the plastic.

#4 Dennis Brady

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 10:35 AM

I've done this before.  Head to a craft store, and look for something called Gallery Glass.  Its basically a thick kind of paint that dries into a flexible plastic.  They make 'liquid lead' that you use first to draw the lead came onto the plexi.  After that dries you just fill in with the colors.  You can make textures using toothpicks to draw wavy patterns.  You can also marbelize using 2-3 colors and a toothpick to swirl them.

Here's the website from the manufacturer: http://www.plaidonline.com/apGG.asp

Its pretty easy stuff to work with.  YOu can remove it afterwards with a razor blade.  On glass, it would peel off, but on plexi, it bond a little more thoroughly to the pourous surface of the plastic.

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Just don't put it in sunlight. It will fade quickly and begin to blister off. Gallery Glass is okay for little suncatchers but not for windows. Suitable for a kindergarten art class - GG is a step down from SGO (that's plastic pretending to be stained glass). If you want something to look like stained glass use stained glass - not plastic and not paint.

The nickname most glass artisans use for GG is "fakey bakey".

#5 Boris_USA

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 08:14 PM

Just don't put it in sunlight.  It will fade quickly and begin to blister off.  Gallery Glass is okay for little suncatchers but not for windows. Suitable for a kindergarten art class - GG is a step down from SGO (that's plastic pretending to be stained glass).  If you want something to look like stained glass use stained glass - not plastic and not paint.

The nickname most glass artisans use for GG is "fakey bakey".

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I would imagine , if doing a "set" for a prop, the "paint on" would be good, since no one is going to stay around and admire the work, while being scared every minute or two. Also would be a lot safer, with all that would be going on. The "fakey" would give you the short term effect you would want, anyway.

#6 malkore

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 08:23 AM

Hmmm, maybe you could paint wax paper and use it for the 'window'? then you could crinckle it up first to add texture. I'm thinkiing magic markers would work good on wax paper...keeping it translucent, but still colorful.




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