Jump to content


Photo

Dalle De Verre - Resources


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 RogerB

RogerB

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 142 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Interests:Architectural stained glass windows, glass blowing, kayaking, hiking

Posted 13 May 2006 - 10:49 AM

The Dalle de Verre method of window construction was discussed in the "Welcome" group, and it got me started researching the subject.

I remember a church that I attended when I was young that had Dalle de Verre windows. I always thought the big chunks of glass were cool - maybe that was the beginning of my love for stained glass. Most of the other Catholic churches that we had in town (Dubuque, Iowa has many, many Catholic churches) had the more typical Gothic Revival style stained glass windows with painted biblical scenes. This "new" church was a round building with these abstract stained glass windows - I now realize that they are Dalle de Verre style.

My research has found that Kokomo Glass still makes the 1" thick glass slabs in various colors - you can order a sample pack from them for about $30. My problem is that I can't find much information on the actual construction technique. I looked for books on the subject, and came up empty. Is anyone aware of any books, websites, etc...

I have a friend (fellow glass-blower) that has wanted to hand-blow rondels for a large window over his entry door, and I couldn't figure a "safe" way to construct it with lead came since the larger rondel edges are usually at least 1/2" thick. The Dalle de Verre method sounds perfect for this application.

Thanks!

#2 Rebecca

Rebecca

    Chocolatier

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,948 posts
  • Location:Kingsport

Posted 13 May 2006 - 03:42 PM

I know I read a description of the process in a book, but I can't for the life of me remember what book! If it comes to me, I'll let you know.

Rebecca

#3 Vic

Vic

    Homeowner

  • Banned
  • PipPipPip
  • 172 posts
  • Interests:Stained glass professional for over 30 years.

Posted 13 May 2006 - 04:31 PM

QUOTE(RogerB @ May 13 2006, 11:49 AM)
The Dalle de Verre method of window construction was discussed in the "Welcome" group, and it got me started researching the subject.


My research has found that Kokomo Glass still makes the 1" thick glass slabs in various colors - you can order a sample pack from them for about $30.  My problem is that I can't find much information on the actual construction technique.  I looked for books on the subject, and came up empty.  Is anyone aware of any books, websites, etc...

I have a friend (fellow glass-blower) that has wanted to hand-blow rondels for a large window over his entry door, and I couldn't figure a "safe" way to construct it with lead came since the larger rondel edges are usually at least 1/2" thick.  The Dalle de Verre method sounds perfect for this application.

Thanks!

View Post





Blenko Glass makes dalles. There is a chapter on technique in "Working with Stained Glass" by Jean Jauques Duval. ISBN 0-960-89706-5

The book is over 30 years old,out of print.

Why are your friends rondells so thick. Rondells are thick in the center and very thin at the edge. Easy to lead up.



#4 RogerB

RogerB

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 142 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Interests:Architectural stained glass windows, glass blowing, kayaking, hiking

Posted 13 May 2006 - 09:58 PM

QUOTE(Vic @ May 13 2006, 04:31 PM)
Blenko Glass makes dalles.  There is a chapter on technique in "Working with Stained Glass" by Jean Jauques Duval.  ISBN 0-960-89706-5

The book is over 30 years old,out of print.

Why are your friends rondells so thick. Rondells are thick in the center and very thin at the edge. Easy to lead up.

View Post


Thanks Vic - I'll see if I can find the book somewhere.

Rondells, like everything else, get better the more you make them. I've "spun"
a few and my friend has "spun" a few, but most were about 1/4" - 1/2" thick at the edge, 6"-12" in diameter. The thicker edge is most likely due to us not having the glass hot enough when we start to spin the pipe. Unfortunately, working with really hot glass takes a lot of practice since the hotter the glass, the more fluid it is. If we end up with a 6" diameter rondell with 1/2" edge, it probably could have been an 8"-10" rondell if it was hot enought to continue spinning.

I've seen smaller rondells incorporated into lead came windows, but I've never seen a rondell 6" or larger. I'm open to suggestions!

#5 Vic

Vic

    Homeowner

  • Banned
  • PipPipPip
  • 172 posts
  • Interests:Stained glass professional for over 30 years.

Posted 13 May 2006 - 10:24 PM

QUOTE(RogerB @ May 13 2006, 10:58 PM)
Thanks Vic - I'll see if I can find the book somewhere.

Roundels, like everything else, get better the more you make them.  I've "spun"
a few and my friend has "spun" a few, but most were about 1/4" - 1/2" thick at the edge, 6"-12" in diameter.  The thicker edge is most likely due to us not having the glass hot enough when we start to spin the pipe.  Unfortunately, working with really hot glass takes a lot of practice since the hotter the glass, the more fluid it is.  If we end up with a 6" diameter roundel with 1/2" edge, it probably could have been an 8"-10" roundel if it was hot enought to continue spinning.

I've seen smaller rondells incorporated into lead came windows, but I've never seen a rondell 6" or larger.  I'm open to suggestions!

View Post





I have a friend who incorporates 10-12" rondells all the time. He spins then with a thin edge that can be leaded. He made 12-14" clear rondells that I cut up for window glass for sidelights and a fan light for an 1850ish reproduction home.

#6 RogerB

RogerB

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 142 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Interests:Architectural stained glass windows, glass blowing, kayaking, hiking

Posted 14 May 2006 - 09:52 AM

QUOTE(Vic @ May 13 2006, 10:24 PM)
I have a friend who incorporates 10-12" rondells all the time. He spins then with a thin edge that can be leaded.  He made 12-14" clear rondells that I cut up for window glass for sidelights and a fan light for an 1850ish reproduction home.

View Post


Vic - I would really like to see some pictures, if you have any.

#7 Vic

Vic

    Homeowner

  • Banned
  • PipPipPip
  • 172 posts
  • Interests:Stained glass professional for over 30 years.

Posted 14 May 2006 - 11:53 AM

QUOTE(RogerB @ May 14 2006, 10:52 AM)
Vic - I would really like to see some pictures, if you have any.

View Post




check out

www.michaeldavisstinedglass.com

click stained glass thumbnail 16 Webpage

#8 Arina

Arina

    Homeowner

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 163 posts
  • Location:Citizen of the world

Posted 14 May 2006 - 04:03 PM

QUOTE(Rebecca @ May 13 2006, 03:42 PM)
I know I read a description of the process in a book, but I can't for the life of me remember what book!  If it comes to me, I'll let you know. 

Rebecca

View Post




"How to work in stained glass" (i have a second edition) by Anita&Seymour Isenberg .They have" Dalles" under Slab -glass...... basic desription of how it is done.

Google brings up lots to check out with" how to work with slab glass."but i did not check any out..

#9 Lynnski

Lynnski

    Homeowner

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Location:Western Massachusetts

Posted 15 May 2006 - 08:54 AM

QUOTE(Vic @ May 14 2006, 11:53 AM)
check out

www.michaeldavisstinedglass.com

click stained glass thumbnail 16 Webpage

View Post



Wow. that work is REALLY exciting! thanks for the link.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users