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Chipped Edges After Grinding


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#1 cdngardener

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Posted 20 October 2006 - 03:09 PM

I have noticed that the edges of my glass pieces are chipped or pitted after grinding. (My scoring is pretty good so the edges are nice and smooth before grinding) I've been told that my grinding bit is either too old or too new, that I need a finer bit and that perhaps I press too hard... all could be true but I thought I would get any insight from those with more experience. I thought I would buy a new finer grit bit (the current bit is about 2 years old)

#2 purplovr

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Posted 20 October 2006 - 07:53 PM

QUOTE(cdngardener @ Oct 20 2006, 04:09 PM) View Post

I have noticed that the edges of my glass pieces are chipped or pitted after grinding. (My scoring is pretty good so the edges are nice and smooth before grinding) I've been told that my grinding bit is either too old or too new, that I need a finer bit and that perhaps I press too hard... all could be true but I thought I would get any insight from those with more experience. I thought I would buy a new finer grit bit (the current bit is about 2 years old)

I would certainly try a new bit. Does your sponge have enoughwater? It's possible the glass isn't getting enough liquid. dizzy.gif

#3 Boris_USA

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Posted 20 October 2006 - 09:19 PM

QUOTE(cdngardener @ Oct 20 2006, 04:09 PM) View Post

I have noticed that the edges of my glass pieces are chipped or pitted after grinding. (My scoring is pretty good so the edges are nice and smooth before grinding) I've been told that my grinding bit is either too old or too new, that I need a finer bit and that perhaps I press too hard... all could be true but I thought I would get any insight from those with more experience. I thought I would buy a new finer grit bit (the current bit is about 2 years old)



My bits usually last about that long. Worse chipping I ever got, was when a section of the diamond abrasive wore off uneven on the bit, for some reason, and the bit started to really chip up the edges. Likely its a worn grinder head, since I am sure you would have noticed a lot sooner, if it was too coarse and too new. The term I like to use for that is "too Agressive" and a grinder head does not get "More" agressive with time and use.

#4 Chantal

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Posted 21 October 2006 - 07:37 AM

I used Inland standard grit for the longest time without this problem.

But then I bought one standard grit grinding head that was chipping off the edges a great deal. To the point that I didn't believe I could cover all the chips with the foil. And in fact, didn't.

BAD....

I stopped using it, and bought an Inland FINE grit. I found that it worked much more like the standard grit bits that I was used to. Maybe a smidgen finer grinding, but pretty close. A teensy bit slower. But at least, glass chips were flying all over my work area, and it wasn't ruining my project!

You might want to consider Aanraku's TWOFER grinder heads for your next purchase.

#5 cdngardener

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Posted 21 October 2006 - 11:08 AM

QUOTE(purplovr @ Oct 20 2006, 08:53 PM) View Post

I would certainly try a new bit. Does your sponge have enoughwater? It's possible the glass isn't getting enough liquid. dizzy.gif


Thanks for the reply; I have tried hard to keep the sponge wet and have enough water to avoid that white powdery accumulation; I will keep my eye on it for sure - it's probably time for a new bit and I think I'll try the Aanraku Twofers but in a finer grit.

QUOTE(Chantal @ Oct 21 2006, 08:37 AM) View Post

I used Inland standard grit for the longest time without this problem.

But then I bought one standard grit grinding head that was chipping off the edges a great deal. To the point that I didn't believe I could cover all the chips with the foil. And in fact, didn't.

BAD....

I stopped using it, and bought an Inland FINE grit. I found that it worked much more like the standard grit bits that I was used to. Maybe a smidgen finer grinding, but pretty close. A teensy bit slower. But at least, glass chips were flying all over my work area, and it wasn't ruining my project!

You might want to consider Aanraku's TWOFER grinder heads for your next purchase.


I've had my eye on one of those for sometime now so I'm going to give it a try; thanks for your advice Chantal

QUOTE(Boris_USA @ Oct 20 2006, 10:19 PM) View Post

My bits usually last about that long. Worse chipping I ever got, was when a section of the diamond abrasive wore off uneven on the bit, for some reason, and the bit started to really chip up the edges. Likely its a worn grinder head, since I am sure you would have noticed a lot sooner, if it was too coarse and too new. The term I like to use for that is "too Agressive" and a grinder head does not get "More" agressive with time and use.


Thanks Boris - I'm going to replace the old bit with a finer grit and see how it goes.

Rick

#6 s.w.ecology

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Posted 16 November 2006 - 07:33 PM

QUOTE(cdngardener @ Oct 20 2006, 01:09 PM) View Post

I have noticed that the edges of my glass pieces are chipped or pitted after grinding. (My scoring is pretty good so the edges are nice and smooth before grinding) I've been told that my grinding bit is either too old or too new, that I need a finer bit and that perhaps I press too hard... all could be true but I thought I would get any insight from those with more experience. I thought I would buy a new finer grit bit (the current bit is about 2 years old)



I have had the same problem. I thought it was the bit at first, but after switching to a new Gryphon 1" bit on my Allstar grinder, I still had the same problem, and still had the same problem on any 1/4" bit I put on.

Turned out that there is an eccentric wobble in the grinder shaft for a 8 year old Allstar. I ended up ordering a new one online, as the cost of shipping it to Glastar and fixing it was comparable to the cost of a new grinder.

Glastar was great to deal with on a persistent, expensive problem. I have to give their customer service a really high rating - that is the only reason I stayed with that brand of grinder.

#7 newoldstyle

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 04:59 AM

QUOTE(s.w.ecology @ Nov 16 2006, 06:33 PM) View Post

I have had the same problem. I thought it was the bit at first, but after switching to a new Gryphon 1" bit on my Allstar grinder, I still had the same problem, and still had the same problem on any 1/4" bit I put on.

Turned out that there is an eccentric wobble in the grinder shaft for a 8 year old Allstar. I ended up ordering a new one online, as the cost of shipping it to Glastar and fixing it was comparable to the cost of a new grinder.

Glastar was great to deal with on a persistent, expensive problem. I have to give their customer service a really high rating - that is the only reason I stayed with that brand of grinder.


I noticed chipping on some of my glass but others did not chip at all so for me I think you have to change pressure and speed according to the glass you are using.

also I made a custom sponge and now have alot less chipping and less splatter and more water where I need it.




#8 s.w.ecology

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 10:39 PM

QUOTE(newoldstyle @ Nov 17 2006, 02:59 AM) View Post

I noticed chipping on some of my glass but others did not chip at all so for me I think you have to change pressure and speed according to the glass you are using.

also I made a custom sponge and now have alot less chipping and less splatter and more water where I need it.


I'm glad that worked for you. My point though, was to illustrate that the simple and cheap answers sometimes don't work, and you have to obtain new equipment before the chipping problem ( or any other you might encouter) needs a complicated and expensive solution to it. I am, however, all for the cheap and easy fixes first.

#9 Cheri

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 12:52 PM

QUOTE(s.w.ecology @ Nov 17 2006, 08:39 PM) View Post

I'm glad that worked for you. My point though, was to illustrate that the simple and cheap answers sometimes don't work, and you have to obtain new equipment before the chipping problem ( or any other you might encouter) needs a complicated and expensive solution to it. I am, however, all for the cheap and easy fixes first.

WOW! I just posted this question in the Kindergarten forum. My question is answered! Yippee! 8confetti.gif




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