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Buying Old Glass


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#1 hidi

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 01:13 PM

Does anyone know the value of older glass? I recently purchased about 25 sheets(2x3ft) of some glass made by A.C.Fischer,a German company. The woman that sold it to me purchased it 17 years ago.It appears to be hand rolled,because of how the edges look.It looks like it has been outside for some of those years,and while this might sound like a stupid question,Ihave to ask; can glass go bad from exposure?Aside from the obvious breakage,can water deposits be removed? Thanks for any help.

#2 Chantal

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 03:13 PM

While no longer produced, this mouth blown antique glass is still being sold today.

AC Fischer
AC Fischer Current Prices

At an average current price of $25/ sq ft, each one of your sheets of glass is worth approximately $150. Your lot of 25 sheets is worth over $3500.

The color variations you see in the glass can be the the product of the way the glass is made. A few glass colors will fade a little over time from UV ray exposure. I am not sure what you mean about water deposits, perhaps they are an accumulation of dirt and minerals? There is a cleaning product for just about everything these days.

#3 Tod Beall

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 04:16 PM

Wow, am I jealous! I love working with full antiques.

One thing that will affect the value is condition - if the sheets are scratched, they would be less desirable and might not bring the prices shown in the list.
I am amazed that it's still available, tho - thanks, Chantal, for that link. I think I'll stick with Lambert's, all things considered.
- Tod

#4 hidi

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 08:11 PM

QUOTE(hidi @ Feb 21 2007, 08:13 AM) View Post
Does anyone know the value of older glass? I recently purchased about 25 sheets(2x3ft) of some glass made by A.C.Fischer,a German company. The woman that sold it to me purchased it 17 years ago.It appears to be hand rolled,because of how the edges look.It looks like it has been outside for some of those years,and while this might sound like a stupid question,Ihave to ask; can glass go bad from exposure?Aside from the obvious breakage,can water deposits be removed? Thanks for any help.



#5 GUMP

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 03:13 PM

While this is a little bit off topic (in the strictest sense) I could not see starting a new thread for my question.

And that question is.... Is there an easy (and somewhat accurate) way to judge the age of glass??

I ask because last year the church I attend replaced the 8 panes of stained glass from the tower. These panes were offered to the members of the congregation. I managed to get one full panel (8 foot x 28 inches) and 2 old window panes (approx. 30 x 28 inches). Additionally, I got a box of glass from one pane that the vendor had disassembled.

Our church is 20 years old, but, was built after the original, founding church was severely damaged by fire. That church was built in the late 1880's. 3 or 4 of the panes in the new tower were from the old church. Hence my question... anyway to tell if the glass (loose or in panes) is from the original church? I fully believe the window panes are, but, have questions about the loose glass and the large panel.

Any feedback is greatly appreciated!! THANKS!!


#6 Dennis Brady

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 03:25 PM

QUOTE(GUMP @ Jul 5 2007, 04:13 PM) View Post
While this is a little bit off topic (in the strictest sense) I could not see starting a new thread for my question.

And that question is.... Is there an easy (and somewhat accurate) way to judge the age of glass??

I ask because last year the church I attend replaced the 8 panes of stained glass from the tower. These panes were offered to the members of the congregation. I managed to get one full panel (8 foot x 28 inches) and 2 old window panes (approx. 30 x 28 inches). Additionally, I got a box of glass from one pane that the vendor had disassembled.

Our church is 20 years old, but, was built after the original, founding church was severely damaged by fire. That church was built in the late 1880's. 3 or 4 of the panes in the new tower were from the old church. Hence my question... anyway to tell if the glass (loose or in panes) is from the original church? I fully believe the window panes are, but, have questions about the loose glass and the large panel.

Any feedback is greatly appreciated!! THANKS!!


It's often possible to identify specific art glass but it's not possible to determine its age. It's easier to identify the age of the lead in the panels by the amount of deterioration.

You can make a rough estimate of age on clear window glass by how smooth it is. Modern "float" glass is perfectly smooth and, when clean, is invisible. Previous to about 1950, "plate" glass was used that had a noticeable amount of wavy distortion. Before 1910 or 1920 most clear glass was significantly distorted - even in small pieces.


#7 wes

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 11:06 AM

QUOTE(Dennis Brady @ Jul 5 2007, 04:25 PM) View Post
It's often possible to identify specific art glass but it's not possible to determine its age. It's easier to identify the age of the lead in the panels by the amount of deterioration.

You can make a rough estimate of age on clear window glass by how smooth it is. Modern "float" glass is perfectly smooth and, when clean, is invisible. Previous to about 1950, "plate" glass was used that had a noticeable amount of wavy distortion. Before 1910 or 1920 most clear glass was significantly distorted - even in small pieces.



You may also do some research thru the older members and try to get some dated pictures of the former church to try and date the windows that you have.
Wes 8hammer.gif




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