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New Cutter's Mate


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#1 Guest_SE Designs_*

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 10:17 AM

I have just received my new Cutter's Mate, still in the box, can you tell me the most work firendly way to set it up? I have an adjustable drafting table and thought that might work well. Please give me your advice.
Thanks, Jeanette

#2 Dennis Brady

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 10:53 AM

I have just received my new Cutter's Mate, still in the box, can you tell me the most work firendly way to set it up?  I have an adjustable drafting table and thought that might work well.  Please give me your advice.
Thanks, Jeanette

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Unless you want to bolt it to your drafting table (which I wouldn't recommend), it works best on any flat surface. Although it comes with plugs to fit into a Morton grid, they're not needed. The CM works as well just sitting on the table. That also makes it easy to pick up and move away if desired - or reclocate to a different table. We keep ours on a shelf and just bring it down when needed.

GREAT tool.

#3 Guest_SE Designs_*

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 11:11 AM

Unless you want to bolt it to your drafting table (which I wouldn't recommend), it works best on any flat surface.  Although it comes with plugs to fit into a Morton grid, they're not needed. 

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I have a Morton grid. The drafting table is not in use now, so my idea is to put the Morton grid on ithe drafting table along with the CM and leave it where it is. Does that sound like a good idea? Also, I am starting tonight on a project that has to be finished by next Saturday (since I have a real job I don't have a lot of time). Does it take a long time to get used to the CM? I am wondering if I should start the new project with it or do it the old way.
Thanks,
Jeanette

#4 Dennis Brady

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 11:33 AM

I have a Morton grid.  The drafting table is not in use now, so my idea is to put the Morton grid on ithe drafting table along with the CM and leave it where it is.  Does that sound like a good idea?  Also, I am starting tonight on a project that has to be finished by next Saturday (since I have a real job I don't have a lot of time).  Does it take a long time to get used to the CM?  I am wondering if I should start the new project with it or do it the old way.
Thanks,
Jeanette

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Your idea will work fine. If you have the Morton grid and like using it, that's a good place to mount the CM. Personally, I detest that grid thing and very much prefer cutting on plywood. The grid also makes it impractical (if not impossible) to cut on a light box (where I believe 99.9% of cutting should be done).

It takes almost zero time to get used to cutting with the CM. You'll love it when you break the first score. The weighted handle already applies the appropriate pressure for cutting, so all you really need do is steer it. What you do have to adapt to is that you might often be watching your pattern line on a different angle then when using a handheld cutter. Take care to either keep bent over the CM, or learn to adapt for the different cutter head position relative to the pattern line when you're viewing it from a slight forward angle.

You should almost immediately discover that the accuracy of your cuts have improved to where you've reduced your grinding requirements by 50% or more. REMEMBER.....when cutting glass, your goal should ALWAYS be to get an accurate enough cut that your grinder never gets turned on. That won't happen at first, but if you work at constantly improving cut accuracy, it WILL happen. When your cutting accuracy has improved, you'll then discover (as all glass experienced artisans have) that leaded work is considerably less work then foil. All you gotta do is cut the glass and lead it together. No grinding, no foiling, no bead soldering. On average, we price labour on leaded as 65 - 70% of that for foil. Considering that labour is usually 90% of the cost, the savings is significant - but only if you become a proficient cutter.

#5 Rebecca

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 12:47 PM

I have a Morton grid.  The drafting table is not in use now, so my idea is to put the Morton grid on ithe drafting table along with the CM and leave it where it is.  Does that sound like a good idea?  Also, I am starting tonight on a project that has to be finished by next Saturday (since I have a real job I don't have a lot of time).  Does it take a long time to get used to the CM?  I am wondering if I should start the new project with it or do it the old way.
Thanks,
Jeanette

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Set it up on your drafting table as you descibe and go to it! I think the easiest way to use it is to pull it toward you. Ray the Cutters' Mate man says to let the screw on the head be the cutters tail light. With the CM, I always stay in front of the head and watch the line I am cutting on from the front. It is much easier than trying to lean all the way over it and look like I do with a regular cutter. Press down on the CM just enough to depress the spring and away you go. Easier on the back because I'm not leaning over, and easier on the hand because I'm not cramped in a grip on a cutter. Even when the arthritis in my thumbs is acting up, I can cut by holding the CM with my fingers curled around it. I don't need the thumb at all! And you will find that you scores break true because the cutter is always at 90 degrees to the glass and your pressure is just right. Enjoy it! If you have trouble, come back and ask again.

Rebecca

#6 Guest_SE Designs_*

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 01:30 PM

If you have trouble, come back and ask again.

Rebecca

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Thanks for your input and I'm sure I'll be back. Can hardly wait to go home and start cutting. If I hadn't been off all last week, I might even feel "sick".:cry: :cry:
Jeanette

#7 Guest_karnit_*

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 02:04 AM

I have just received my new Cutter's Mate, still in the box, can you tell me the most work firendly way to set it up?  I have an adjustable drafting table and thought that might work well.  Please give me your advice.
Thanks, Jeanette

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Where can I read an explanation on the Cutter's Mate? :cat:

#8 Rebecca

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 11:14 AM

Where can I read an explanation on the Cutter's Mate? :cat:

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Try this:
http://www.cuttersmate.com/

#9 Guest_karnit_*

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 01:45 AM

Try this:
http://www.cuttersmate.com/

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Interesting-I still cut the "regular" way,but this does look sophisticated! :cat:

#10 Dennis Brady

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 10:44 AM

Interesting-I still cut the "regular" way,but this does look sophisticated! :cat:

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A glass saw is a toy that many foolishly believe is a tool.
A Cutters Mate is a tool that some mistakenly think is a toy.

#11 Rebecca

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 01:22 PM

Interesting-I still cut the "regular" way,but this does look sophisticated! :cat:

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It is especially helpful if you have carpal tunnel or arthritis in your hands and wrists.

Rebecca

#12 Guest_karnit_*

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Posted 28 February 2005 - 02:39 AM

It is especially helpful if you have carpal tunnel or arthritis in your hands and wrists.

Rebecca

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Excellent point! Will be checking this out for future reference.
:cat:

#13 Guest_craftifox_*

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Posted 01 March 2005 - 03:59 PM

A glass saw is a toy that many foolishly believe is a tool.
A Cutters Mate is a tool that some mistakenly think is a toy.

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Dennis,

I am glad you posted this.

I have back pain and I thought this would help, plus I think my breaks would be so much cleaner.

I have really been wrestling with the decision of whether this would just be a crutch that would prevent me from ever getting really good with a cutter.

I think the biggest problem I have is keeping the cutter completely straight. My cuts are pretty accurate, but they don't break clean and completely vertical many times.

I just got some Silberschnitt running pliers for Valentines day and I am breaking out inside curves better than ever. I told my husband I wanted a cutters mate for combo birthday Christmas this year.

#14 Guest_jim2100_*

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 12:53 AM

I have just received my new Cutter's Mate, still in the box, can you tell me the most work firendly way to set it up?  I have an adjustable drafting table and thought that might work well.  Please give me your advice.
Thanks, Jeanette

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Hi
A few questions. How do you like it now that you have had it for quite awhile.
Is it meant for all stained glass cutting?
What size is best to get? 16 or 21" arm. I found it on sale tonight after reading this post for $224.039 for the 21" arm.
I am new to stain glass. Did my first sun catcher several days ago, and am now starting a 34 piece project. Round piece with cardinal on branch. My main question is, Is this for cutting all your glass as you do stained glass?
Would you recommend it for a beginner?
Jim

#15 Guest_jeanmc_*

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 05:52 PM

hello where do i post my questions?

#16 glassgunner

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 07:47 PM

Hello Jean:

This is a good place to post if you have a question about glass
cutting tools. Jump right in, the water's fine.

Your friend,
Ray

QUOTE(jeanmc @ Mar 20 2007, 05:52 PM) View Post
hello where do i post my questions?



#17 Guest_bridgetbsandiego_*

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 01:41 AM

Jim;

did you ever get replies to your question about arm length? I am at my wit's end and have to get a cutter's mate.

need to know which size; there's only a $25 difference...

Bridget


#18 Dennis Brady

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 10:39 AM

QUOTE(bridgetbsandiego @ Sep 23 2007, 02:41 AM) View Post
Jim;

did you ever get replies to your question about arm length? I am at my wit's end and have to get a cutter's mate.

need to know which size; there's only a $25 difference...

Bridget


I'd suggest the biggest one you can afford and provide space for.


#19 Rebecca

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 03:18 PM

The biggest one they make is awkward for me to use. The small or medium are great. As a matter of fact, I use the small one to cut down full sheets of glass. I just set it on top of the sheet and cut away.

Rebecca




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