Jump to content


Taurus 3 Ring Saw


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_strawberryblondie_*

Guest_strawberryblondie_*
  • Guests

Posted 02 December 2007 - 06:19 PM

I am getting a Taurus 3 ring saw and would love to hear from any of you that own a Taurus or any other ring saw. Any tips, tricks, advice, knowledge, or just plain old chat about it would be great. Hope to hear from you soon.


Strawberryblondie peace.gif

#2 Guest_ezbleedr_*

Guest_ezbleedr_*
  • Guests

Posted 02 December 2007 - 08:04 PM

QUOTE(strawberryblondie @ Dec 2 2007, 06:19 PM) View Post
I am getting a Taurus 3 ring saw and would love to hear from any of you that own a Taurus or any other ring saw. Any tips, tricks, advice, knowledge, or just plain old chat about it would be great. Hope to hear from you soon.
Strawberryblondie peace.gif


I've had a Taurus for several years. It seldom gets any use, but when I need it for difficult cuts it is hard to beat. Blade replacement is expensive (at least for me) and not the easiest thing to do, but after some fussing it went on OK. Keeping the water level up is very important, and having the instruction manual close by is a big help. I think the newer models have some improvements over mine. Being a rank armature I have a lot of trouble with cutting inside curves and the saw does a great job there. There has been some discussion here in the past about the merits of saws over other means of cutting. I think it still boils down to what kind of work you want to do and how comfortable you are with "power tools". It works well for me.

#3 Boris_USA

Boris_USA

    Lampman

  • Assistant Administrator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,553 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Shore of Maryland USA
  • Interests:Way too Many...

Posted 02 December 2007 - 08:19 PM

QUOTE(strawberryblondie @ Dec 2 2007, 06:19 PM) View Post
I am getting a Taurus 3 ring saw and would love to hear from any of you that own a Taurus or any other ring saw. Any tips, tricks, advice, knowledge, or just plain old chat about it would be great. Hope to hear from you soon.
Strawberryblondie peace.gif

I have the Taurus II and a couple of band saws. The ring saw is by far the better tool and does more easier. I dont use it that much, but it does everything I need it to do, when I do need one. I think you will be happy with it.

#4 Guest_Taylor Hagan Design_*

Guest_Taylor Hagan Design_*
  • Guests

Posted 12 December 2007 - 12:42 PM

QUOTE(strawberryblondie @ Dec 2 2007, 05:19 PM) View Post
I am getting a Taurus 3 ring saw and would love to hear from any of you that own a Taurus or any other ring saw. Any tips, tricks, advice, knowledge, or just plain old chat about it would be great. Hope to hear from you soon.
Strawberryblondie peace.gif


I bought the Taurus 3 when it came out. I was not working in glass full-time, so I only used it off and on. These are my thoughts after having used it a while--
1) use a piece of scrap to practice on making inside and outside cuts. it takes a while to get used to the amount of glass the saw blade removes in addition to the pattern.
2)try to avoid pushing the glass-since the blade is round, allow the piece to flow. it is not like cutting wood with a band saw. practice pulling the piece through a curve and going side to side.

I hope this helps.

#5 MillenniumArtGlass

MillenniumArtGlass

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Near Auburn, Northern California
  • Interests:I'm an author, historian and collector of lithography and label art, a professional jazz musician, and recent stained glass artist. I love sushi, fishing, garage sales and living in the mountains. I am from the San Francisco Bay Area. My wife is a school teacher. I have a website called fruitcratelabels.com relating to my business of the past thirty years. My stained glass website is www.millenniumartglass.com

Posted 13 January 2008 - 02:02 PM

I have a Taurus II and a Taurus III. Used them for YEARS. I LOVE them both, especially the III. I use it all the time, and especially for detailed glass, ripple, drapery and everything else. My website shows the kind of work I create. A couple things i do are these:

1) Before i start it any particcularr day, I move the blade with my fingers through the water one or two revolutions before first starting it up. I do this when it has sat for a day, or week or so. This wets the blade so as not to shock the rubber drive belt when beginning a new work session. It lubricates the belt before the first "on".

2) I use marking pens to draw lines on the glass, then cover those with clear package tape to keep the image on the glass. When water collects on the glass (or tape), it both gets in the way of seeing the image (lines) AND on a large piece of glass the water will build up and come forward and get my clothes wet. SO, I put a strip of 1/4" thick wood under the front lip of the saw itself, elevating the front of the saw, and the water rolls BACK toward the back and off the glass! Works great.

3) Open the saw and lubricate the wheels and moving parts after EVERY POROJECT. Use it for a window, or about 8 hours of saw use off and on, then open the case, lube it, then go back to work. Take GOOD care of this tool and it will be good to you. It is medium-maintenance, but worth it!

4) I clean the glass dust out of the bottom of the saw after every project. I drain it, the take a spatula and get ALL the moist grit and sand out of the bottom. That way every project starts with a fresh lube, fresh water, and no crud in the water compartment. ( I do the same with my grinders. New water and clean out the sediments after EACH project).

I LOVE my saws!!!!!!! I also take GOOD care of them. And anytime I have had a problem, or broken part or blade, I send it/them to Taurus and they have always sent me parts (free). Don't say that too loudly. :) I don't abuse the privelage and they are very cool about customer service. I only bug them if it is a saw performance problem. If I break a blade because i was in a hurry or dumb, I buy another and don't bug them -- Pat


#6 Dennis Brady

Dennis Brady

    Curmudgeon

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,081 posts

Posted 20 January 2008 - 02:02 PM

For anybody considering a new saw, I heartily recommend they try the new one from Gryphon. The shortcomings and design flaws in the Taurus have been corrected and the blades are dramatically less costly.


#7 Theresa

Theresa

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Virginia

Posted 30 January 2008 - 05:38 PM

QUOTE(MillenniumArtGlass @ Jan 13 2008, 02:02 PM) View Post
2) I use marking pens to draw lines on the glass, then cover those with clear package tape to keep the image on the glass. When water collects on the glass (or tape), it both gets in the way of seeing the image (lines) AND on a large piece of glass the water will build up and come forward and get my clothes wet. SO, I put a strip of 1/4" thick wood under the front lip of the saw itself, elevating the front of the saw, and the water rolls BACK toward the back and off the glass! Works great.


Great tips, I tried it today... my lines stayed on and my clothes stayed dry...Thanks!!!

-Theresa

#8 Guest_kujo_*

Guest_kujo_*
  • Guests

Posted 31 January 2008 - 11:43 PM

I love my Taurus 3, I was finding it not working well one day and called the company and they sent me some new parts for free. great service. I use it quite often because much of the cuts I do are very deficult or organic. I find it very useful when I buy expensive handmade glass that breaks wildly to use the saw so as to use every little piece of my glass.

What I mean is I can lay out my pattern pieces in an interlocked manner and cut with my saw in between the pieces and then go ahead and hand cut the rest of the piece. This saves me alot in glass.

Another thing is watch the video that comes with the saw, You will find that the saw has many uses you never realised.

Good luck, I have never regreted it.

#9 Guest_renaissance_*

Guest_renaissance_*
  • Guests

Posted 11 February 2008 - 09:45 AM

QUOTE(MillenniumArtGlass @ Jan 13 2008, 02:02 PM) View Post
I have a Taurus II and a Taurus III. Used them for YEARS. I LOVE them both, especially the III. I use it all the time, and especially for detailed glass, ripple, drapery and everything else. My website shows the kind of work I create. A couple things i do are these:[...]


What do you use to "Lube" the Blade/saw ??
Renaissance

renaissancez4@cox.net

#10 MillenniumArtGlass

MillenniumArtGlass

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Near Auburn, Northern California
  • Interests:I'm an author, historian and collector of lithography and label art, a professional jazz musician, and recent stained glass artist. I love sushi, fishing, garage sales and living in the mountains. I am from the San Francisco Bay Area. My wife is a school teacher. I have a website called fruitcratelabels.com relating to my business of the past thirty years. My stained glass website is www.millenniumartglass.com

Posted 23 February 2008 - 06:57 AM

The Taurus manufacturer, Gemini Saws, provides a tube of lube. Or 3 in 1 oil will work. BUT, don't use too much or it will get all over the glass and the saw. Some people suggest a non-sudsing organic soap like Dr. Bornner's peppermint soap. You don't want sudsing, you want "slippery". Oils need to be cleaned off the glass later or foil won't stick. So an non-oil based lubricant is better.

By the way, the blades are expensive but remember two things and you won't break any... Don't force the glass, take your time, be in no hurry, let the saw do the work SLOWLY. If it takes 5-10 minutes to do something intricate, just be patient. Your care will be rewarded.

Next, THE MOST IMPORTANT PARTS IN YOUR SAW... are the wheels that hold the blade steady. These WILL wear out and the groves get bigger. Replace them often, and you will lengthen blade life and staibilty and do much finer work!!! If you let the grooves grow too much, you will "throw" blades and stress the glass and the motor. Also, keep the water level at LEAST up to the line they provide. I keep my water level a half inch higher than the line!

Finally, don't chill the water with ice as some people suggest. i find warm glass and room temperature water "relax" the glass and make it less brittle and tempermental. The blade will run cool if you just work very slowly and let it do its job slowly.
:) Pat

Millennium Art Glass .com


#11 Countrygal52

Countrygal52

    Tourist

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 09 June 2016 - 09:56 AM

Hallo All, I have just posted the topic below in the Kindergarten section of the forum but perhaps here it is more appropriate.
 
"Hallo All, I have just started following this forum and I hope this is the right place for my question. I make soldered jewelry so I cut glass by hand; I spend a lot of time cutting heart shaped glass, it is always dificult to match 2 heart shapes and I must do a lot of grinding with my glastar machine. A couple of weeks back I decided to invest in a Taurus Gemini saw especially to cut hearts. Well it's been a disaster so far, my cutting line is wiggly, the hearts are misshapen, no two hearts are the same. I am really frustrated. I know that it is a different way of cutting compared to a regular saw and I do let the Taurus cut forward, sideways etc....I just seem to have no control, can't cut a straight line. Can anybody help me with some tips? I saw the video where they use a megablade which cuts forward like a regular saw but they use it for ceramic tiles and granite and maybe it's not suitable for glass. Any help would be welcome, thank you.
 
I am attaching a picture of the hearts I cut today..what a horror! and these are the best ones!"

 

I don't seem to be able to attach a picture of the hearts here.

 

 
 
Fulvia (from Italy)



#12 John

John

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 178 posts

Posted 09 June 2016 - 12:32 PM

As far as cutting the hearts, I find if I use one of my pinkies as anchor point on the saw's grid it is easier for me to have better control of the glass' movement.

 

There is a  "T3 accessory kit" available for the Taurus III saw.  It has an adjustable straight edge among several other help aids.  The straight edge has 2 pins on the bottoms which fit into the grid holes of the saw.  By angling the straight edge, it will also fit on the grid surface of my grinders.  The kit is around $25.

Product Description: This kit makes your Taurus 3 even better! Includes a circle maker that cuts perfect circles in difficult glass from 1-1/4" to 15-3/4" diameter, a 30º lamp wedge for cutting and beveling lamp pieces (for a perfect fit on rounded forms), a straight edge (fits anywhere on the work surface and gives a straight line in any direction) a 45º stand-up edger bevels edges (for making perfect boxes) and two cut-off triangles.
  • Circle Maker
  • Lamp Wedge
  • Straight Edge
  • Stand-up Edger
  • Two cut-off triangles

No I don't use the ring saw a lot, but as stated by several members above, there are times when it is literally indispensable.

 

- I use grinder coolant in the saw's water.



#13 Countrygal52

Countrygal52

    Tourist

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 09 June 2016 - 02:21 PM

Thank you Glasser! I had a look at the T3 accessory kit. I'll try again of course and will follow your advice to use my pinkie as anchor point. I just find it very difficult to follow the marker edge, I seem to slip into it even if I don't want to. Lol!



#14 Boris_USA

Boris_USA

    Lampman

  • Assistant Administrator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,553 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Shore of Maryland USA
  • Interests:Way too Many...

Posted 10 June 2016 - 12:20 AM

Thank you Glasser! I had a look at the T3 accessory kit. I'll try again of course and will follow your advice to use my pinkie as anchor point. I just find it very difficult to follow the marker edge, I seem to slip into it even if I don't want to. Lol!

 

Work on feeding the cutting line directly into the front of the blade while turning your work into it.  Just imaging that the front is the only cutting edge on the saw.  Its almost impossible to make precise side cuts, when your first learning your saw, or it was for me.  I was also used to using band saws, so already had the basic technique.  I just had to learn the saws.
 



#15 Tod Beall

Tod Beall

    Daily Mirror Owner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,632 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts just west of Brimfield
  • Interests:Mostly flat glass. I started with sg over 30 years ago. I also collect books about sg. Please visit Beall Glass Studio on Face Book.

Posted 10 June 2016 - 08:39 AM

Another technique for making small hearts is to cut a rough shape with your glass cutter then grind into the shape with a small grinder head such as a 1/4" or even the 1/8" diameter. No saw required.

 

Working with lead, creating a sharp inner point is pretty easy using an overlay technique; it's possible to do a similar "hack" with a

small bit of foil overlay.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users