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Keeping Patterns On Glass Under Ring Saw


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#1 Guest_renaissance_*

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Posted 09 March 2008 - 09:22 PM

I use my Tarus Ring Saw extensively
Complex patterns - Few Geometric shapes or straight lines- mostly freehand
The Water Cooling system of the saw tends to "Wash Away" the patterns before I can cut them.

Strangely, those lines that survive the saw, are hard to remove afterward.
( I Use Acetone)

Have tried several methods to mark the glass patterns before sawing

Each is useful to a degree under specific circumstances
No one is universally succesful
None are perfect

Useing:
* Sharpies
* Industrial Strength Sharpies
* Stadler Marking Pens
Black
Silver
White
Gold

* Mark patterns on either front or back of glass

* Cover marked patterns with clear packing tape
* Cover Glass with Clear Packing tape and then marking patterns on tape
* Mark pattterns on glass and then cover with sheets of "Laminating Material"

For those of you who use a ring saw
How do YOU do it?
Can you suggest anything I have not tried ??

What works best?



#2 Guest_Savant_*

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Posted 09 March 2008 - 11:32 PM

Can you suggest anything I have not tried ??

What works best?
[/quote]

staedtler lumocolor is one of the better markers for what you're doing.
sharpies have there place, but will not stand up to heat.
Itís not so much the coolant or water that makes youíre markings dance.
glass grinding and ring saws cause friction, itís the heat that causes the glass to expand and contract, resulting in loss of contact to the surface.

Try one of these oil base pens. Clean with acetone for cold work or mineral spirits for fused work.

Have you tried this staedtler?

STAEDTLER 352 permanent marker # 1 and #9


If so try one of these.

Uni Paint PX-21 Ė Fine




Pilot Gold & Silver Fine & Medium



Savant


#3 kjt

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 06:48 AM

Smear a light coating of chapstick over your line once it has dried. Works like a charm.

Kev

#4 Vicki

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 07:33 AM

Would the chapstick work for grinding or would it gum up the bit?

#5 Guest_pattyz_*

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 08:15 AM

QUOTE(renaissance @ Mar 9 2008, 09:22 PM) View Post
I use my Tarus Ring Saw extensively
Complex patterns - Few Geometric shapes or straight lines- mostly freehand
The Water Cooling system of the saw tends to "Wash Away" the patterns before I can cut them.

Strangely, those lines that survive the saw, are hard to remove afterward.
( I Use Acetone)

Have tried several methods to mark the glass patterns before sawing

Each is useful to a degree under specific circumstances
No one is universally succesful
None are perfect

Useing:
* Sharpies
* Industrial Strength Sharpies
* Stadler Marking Pens
Black
Silver
White
Gold

* Mark patterns on either front or back of glass

* Cover marked patterns with clear packing tape
* Cover Glass with Clear Packing tape and then marking patterns on tape
* Mark pattterns on glass and then cover with sheets of "Laminating Material"

For those of you who use a ring saw
How do YOU do it?
Can you suggest anything I have not tried ??

What works best?


I cut (by hand or saw) with the pattern on the glass. I also grind that way. For small patterns I run them off on photo-grade paper; larger patterns I cover with clear contact paper on both sides before cutting out the pieces. Use a glue stick to adhere pattern pieces to glass. Let the glue set for a little while. Also, after using the saw I let the pattern redry on the glass before doing any final touches with the grinder. This method has been foolproof for me. Glass pieces are dead-on accurate.

#6 Dawnt

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 11:19 AM

I have a Denver bandsaw and my god, does that thing throw water! I rubber cement the paper pattern to the glass and cut, much like above, minus a few steps.

#7 kjt

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 11:47 AM

You can use the chapstick for grinding as well. It is also very easy to remove as well when you are done.

#8 Guest_Sunny_*

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 01:24 PM

QUOTE(renaissance @ Mar 9 2008, 09:22 PM) View Post
I use my Tarus Ring Saw extensively
Complex patterns - Few Geometric shapes or straight lines- mostly freehand
The Water Cooling system of the saw tends to "Wash Away" the patterns before I can cut them.

Strangely, those lines that survive the saw, are hard to remove afterward.
( I Use Acetone)

Have tried several methods to mark the glass patterns before sawing

Each is useful to a degree under specific circumstances
No one is universally succesful
None are perfect

Useing:
* Sharpies
* Industrial Strength Sharpies
* Stadler Marking Pens
Black
Silver
White
Gold

* Mark patterns on either front or back of glass

* Cover marked patterns with clear packing tape
* Cover Glass with Clear Packing tape and then marking patterns on tape
* Mark pattterns on glass and then cover with sheets of "Laminating Material"

For those of you who use a ring saw
How do YOU do it?
Can you suggest anything I have not tried ??

What works best?



#9 Guest_Sunny_*

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 01:34 PM

Because we have heavy usage of the ring saw at my studio, I have found that "Mark Stay II" works better than anyother method we've tried. Also, if you keep your saw clean I've never had to use the "coolant systems". Sunny

#10 Dagnabbitz

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Posted 11 March 2008 - 06:49 PM

I use the apply pattern physically to the glass...I first apply rubber glue to underside of properly cut pattern.....press it on the glass...wait a minute then apply a thin coat of the same rubber glue to top of pattern....allow dry over night or 12 hours...I have found this to be a good way to cut the pattern out perfectly....and also protect pattern for reuse as this method waterproofs the patterns. Reuse of patterns can save time, so I try not to nick the pattern with the Ringsaw. I have successfully reused patterns many times....

#11 Guest_ezbleedr_*

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 03:54 PM

Stay mark works OK, but a wax toilet ring (new of course) dabbed on the finger and rubbed over the line does the same thing, and a lot cheaper.

#12 Guest_natureglass_*

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 05:59 PM

I have tried a lot of different things but have settled on one thing. I use a sharpie fine point industrial marker to get my pattern on the glass then I spray the glass with lacquer or acrylic clear spray paint. Be sure to clean the glass prior to marking your pattern on the glass. Be sure you have plenty of water in your saw in order to keep your glass as cool as possible as the heat generated is a big factor in removing your pattern. Of course the lacquer must be removed after your glass is cut. This is done by dipping the piece in a small container of lacquer thinner and wiping with a paper towel. I leave the marks on the glass until I have done my final grinding and fitting, then I clean, foil and place the piece ready for solder. I trace all of the pieces of one color on the glass of choice, cut so that several or all pieces are on one or several larger pieces of glass. I then spray with clear lacquer or acrylic . By the way, you can still use your glass cutter after you have sprayed your protective coating on the glass. This may sound like extra steps, however the pattern stays on the glass and it only takes a minute or two to remove the spay coating. I always try to transfer my pattern with a little space between each piece. After the lacquer dries which takes about 10 minutes, I then seperate each piece with my glass cutter. Otherwise cutting one piece on your saw may affect the coating on the adjacent piece. This system is not tottaly bulletproof, but it works well for me and I build Tiffany reproduction shades, a lot of small pieces. Hope this helps. Any questions, let me know

#13 Guest_strawberryblondie_*

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 09:52 PM

Hi there natureglass. I too love my ring saw and have experimented extensively with trying to keep pattern markings in place. To date I have found that chapstick and vaseline do not work as well as Mark Stay. I really have found it to be superior. I have found that Sharpie sells gold and silver "pain pens", not markers, and they stick better than most, especially covered with Mark Stay. Anyway that is what works for me, hope you come up with something that works well for you 8hersheyskiss.gif

Linda






QUOTE(renaissance @ Mar 9 2008, 07:22 PM) View Post
I use my Tarus Ring Saw extensively
Complex patterns - Few Geometric shapes or straight lines- mostly freehand
The Water Cooling system of the saw tends to "Wash Away" the patterns before I can cut them.

Strangely, those lines that survive the saw, are hard to remove afterward.
( I Use Acetone)

Have tried several methods to mark the glass patterns before sawing

Each is useful to a degree under specific circumstances
No one is universally succesful
None are perfect

Useing:
* Sharpies
* Industrial Strength Sharpies
* Stadler Marking Pens
Black
Silver
White
Gold

* Mark patterns on either front or back of glass

* Cover marked patterns with clear packing tape
* Cover Glass with Clear Packing tape and then marking patterns on tape
* Mark pattterns on glass and then cover with sheets of "Laminating Material"

For those of you who use a ring saw
How do YOU do it?
Can you suggest anything I have not tried ??

What works best?



#14 cefoley

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 12:49 PM

I use my Tarus Ring Saw extensively
Complex patterns - Few Geometric shapes or straight lines- mostly freehand
The Water Cooling system of the saw tends to "Wash Away" the patterns before I can cut them.

Strangely, those lines that survive the saw, are hard to remove afterward.
( I Use Acetone)

Have tried several methods to mark the glass patterns before sawing

Each is useful to a degree under specific circumstances
No one is universally succesful
None are perfect
I use a ring saw, the best thing I have found that really works is a sandblasting mat .I just cut the pattern out on this, peel off the backing & put it on the glass. The other thing that is working for me is a BIC white out pen, if you let it dry, it will not come off during the cutting.
Useing:
* Sharpies
* Industrial Strength Sharpies
* Stadler Marking Pens
Black
Silver
White
Gold

* Mark patterns on either front or back of glass

* Cover marked patterns with clear packing tape
* Cover Glass with Clear Packing tape and then marking patterns on tape
* Mark pattterns on glass and then cover with sheets of "Laminating Material"

For those of you who use a ring saw
How do YOU do it?
Can you suggest anything I have not tried ??

What works best?



#15 sundrop

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 07:21 PM

I don't use my ring saw very often but have found that the vaseline works best for me. I think one of the main reasons there are problems are we get in a hurry and do not let the marks dry long enough.When I started waiting longer after marking then using vaseline I had more sucess. I do think the gold or silver markers stay on better. This is just how I do it now.

#16 Audrey

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 08:46 AM

I, too, find the gold or silver pens and the white out pen stay on best, but all seem to dry up in the pen or tip quickly and have to be replaced. I cover every line with stick glue or chap stick. Helps some, but not perfect by any means.

#17 Spotteddot

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 04:14 PM

I use the Chinese Art Pencils, get them at craft/art store, they are water proof and with a little scrubbing with a nylon brush, will come off the glass when done, and they come in a wide variety of colors. I also will print out my pattern, tack it onto poster board with the spray glue, cut out and glue (carpernter's wood glue) onto the glass for the ring saw. I have tried the sharpies & mark stay and it works to some degree but still will disappear while sawing.

#18 cefoley

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 11:55 AM

This really works..Bic has a new pen..white out, nice fine line, let it dry a few minutes, it does not come off during sawing. This also works, I also use sandblasting mat, sort of a mac tac stuff, I draw my pattern on this, peel off the backing, stick it to the glass & it doesn't come off either.Try it, you will be pleased with the results..Cathy

#19 goldcountryjon

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Posted 10 December 2018 - 04:14 PM

I've been having problems with lines washing off for years. I found this blog and tried everything that was suggested throughout the thread, with scattered success. I used rubber cement to hold the pattern on the glass and then grind around it. That ruined my pattern pieces, even though I had laminated them. I tried spraying acrylic, and it was ok, but difficult to get off of the glass when done. I tried different types of pens and markers. I tried chap stick and vaseline, too. Those two were somewhat successful but messy.

 

I tried the Mark Stay last. I wish I had found it years ago! I no longer have the old frustration of when my line washes away. It's easy to apply and it is thick enough to apply only where you want it. I found that if I use a pin to stir it up a bit, it is easier to get a small amount on my finger. Just like other people have commented, "just a dab'll do ya". Mine arrived quickly and was in good condition in the jar. I soaked it in hot water before I used it the first time. 

 

I recommend Mark Stay.






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