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Bevel Cluster Question


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#1 Jasmine

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 11:17 AM

I just received a bevel cluster I special ordered. I was planning do the project in lead came, but the edges of the bevels are under 2mm thick (or should I say, 2mm THIN). That's must too thin to fill the came channels properly, so I might have to foil them. If I foil them, am I going to have to trim the foil all around? Otherwise, even the 3/16" foil is going to make an unattractively thick lead line.

Help!

#2 DP

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 12:38 PM

I've seen this issue with American Bevels and I trimmed excess foil. If someone knows how to fit paper thin bevel edges into lead came, I'd love to hear it too.

#3 Rebecca

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 01:23 PM

I've never had a problem. Putty fills the gap. And a roller will smooth the came down over the edge.

Rebecca

#4 Stephen Richard

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 03:47 PM

You can obtain low heart lead came in smaller widths. These are often used for plain glazing in furniture. They normally have 3mm high hearts, so thin glass will fit with little movement. Otherwise, as previously said, the putty takes up the slack. Although I would use a fid rather than a roller to dress the leaves.
steve

#5 Jasmine

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 04:03 PM

These bevel edges are paper-thin. I'll have to apply the putty with a shovel!

Thanks for the loew-heart tip, I'll be checking it out.

#6 Tod Beall

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 05:01 PM

Jasmine:
What face width and style of lead were you planning on using? One reason there are so many sizes and styles is that each application benefits from an appropriately sized and styled lead. Many retail shops carry a limited selection but other studios in your area may be have a good suggestion (possibly that low heart stuff) and may sell you a few pieces.

For a real thin glass, perhaps even a "regular" height, narrow, flat H would work. You will end up easing over the flanges (both sides) to make the lead resemble a round came anyway! Kinda.

IMHO, foiled bevels usually don't look quite right. It's about scale and quality of line, I think.
But remember, every rule has an exception......

Regards - Tod

PS: After you test fit all of the cluster pieces, you may find you need to grind a tad off each piece, thereby fattening up the edge a little.

#7 Stephen Richard

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 04:03 AM

Having come back to this thread, it occurs to me that you have bought bevels designed for glueing to glass for double glazed units. It could be worth checking for the future the thickness of the glass, the angle of the bevel and the width of the bevel. This will indicate how thick the edge will be.

Of course, you could ask about the proposed use fo the bevels. Although the suppliers may not know/care.

steve




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