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Vitreous Beginner


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#1 GlassJaw

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 01:55 PM

I'd like to get into painting on glass with vitreous paints. (if this is in the wrong section, feel free to move it!)

The question I have is that all of the glass I currently have is standard off the shelf stuff that anyone might use for making leaded glass windows. Bullseye, Wissmach, etc... Is this glass able to be fired with vitreous paints? If so, is there any place to get temperature information about the glass to find out what temp it starts to lose shape? I know most paints fire between 1000 - 1400 F. I suppose a manufacturer would be a good place to start, but a nice comprehensive online source with tables would be even better!

Also, any pointers on a good book for beginning vitreous/fired glass painting and kiln procedures?

Thanks!!



#2 Stephen Richard

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 04:20 PM

Vitreous paints cure in the 650C range which is around 1200. You do not need to go higher than that, ever. Enamels and stains fire from about 520C (970F) to 580C (1075F). So you will not need to worry about the glass changing shape much.

Most glass can be painted and fired. Those I have found difficult are the Youghieney (SP!) and the catspaw opals of Bullseye and Urorobors. Some wissmach glass is sensitive, so it is best to test it to 650C with paint on it before commiting.

The classic book on glass painting is by Albinus Elskus. Peter McGrain has one out too. And there are lots of others.

Steve

#3 Dawnt

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 07:05 AM

Hi, Glassjaw....welcome to the boards!

You can paint on your regular art glass, and often with wonderful results. However, some glass....and there is really no telling what ones, will "strike" or change color at a lower temp than the enamel maturing temps.

As with Steve, I've found that softer opals and particularly opal mixes have more trouble...Youghi and Armstrong especially.

I like Sunshine enamels best for color retention.

The Elskus book is out of print and very pricey to come by. McGrain has a DVD instructional set that is supposed to be quite good. I haven't seen it personally, so can't vouch, but I've heard it is much more easy to follow than the book.

Good luck and have fun!
Dawn


#4 Tod Beall

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 03:24 PM

Welcome, Glassjaw!
Peter McGrain has videos & DVD's on "traditional" painting. Many s.g. retailers carry these and they turn up occasinally on eBay but generally new. Sometimes used on Amazon. I felt they were fairly logical and an OK intro, but not what I expected from such a dynamic & out of the box character. i.e.: Kind of slow-moving......... which is probably a good thing.

There is a DVD "by" Albinas Elskus which should be available from the Stained Glass Association of America. It's wonderful to watch but I've only seen it once so don't know if it's good for beginners or better for intermediate and advanced level painters. They also have a reprint of their "Painting for Stained Glass" instruction book from 1992. I have not seen this myself. http://www.cafepress.com/sgaa.57292061

In some localities, you can find actual, in-person instruction. Look around for retailers or studios or ask on various s.g. discussion boards like this one about lessons in your area. Additionally, there are many folks right here who have great skills and are very willing to share.

Good luck & have fun! - Tod

#5 GlassJaw

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 04:42 PM

Thanks for the advice and information, everyone. I'll look into the videos and books; there aren't any readily apparent studios doing fired glass instruction in my area, but I'll keep a lookout.

#6 GlassJaw

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 06:29 PM

Ok, I have another question to ask, this time regarding frit.

After doing some research in books and on the web, I am slightly confused... Is Frit and Vitreous Paint essentially the same thing? IOW, if I were to buy frit and grind it down (or find a supplier of fine frit powder), and then mix it with (insert suspension agent here - clove oil, water/gum arabic), would that work for glass painting? My other half is into enameled jewelry, the beautiful old stuff like Liberty & Co, Charles Horner, David Andersen and the like, and it requires the use of powdered glass frit as well. It'd be great if we could share supplies... (Of course, I'd get stuck with the grinding of the glass and she'd steal it :?)

#7 Mickjay

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 08:12 PM

Hiya Glassjaw,

I found my copy of the Elskus book this summer for $125. It's pretty straight forward stuff. There is also a website from Williams and Byrne from beautiful glass studios.com that offers online tutorial and most of it is free or very reasonable. Unsure of the frit question. I am presently testing out the Reusche line and must add that if you want it quick, order it directly from the manufacturer. I wasted about a month and a half going through an online supplier who said they had it, when the in fact did not. Best of luck.

Mick J
Charlevoix, MI

#8 GlassJaw

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 09:04 PM

Ah...nevermind. I've done some more digging and found that frit is similar to vitreous paint, but not the same. Apparently vitreous pain has additives such as metal oxides along with the powdered glass. It is interesting that I did find one glass artist offering lessons on how to paint with frit, though...




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