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#1 Mittens The Cat

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 04:36 PM

Where to you get ALL these ideas, especially the Art Nouveau pieces?

#2 Chantal

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 05:43 PM

The art nouveau patterns aren't inspired by actual art nouveau stained glass, but rather, by antique wallpaper patterns that I adapt to glass.

These designs can be variously found in very old books, or occasionally, collated reprints of the images in these books, offered as copyright-free material.

I have one book of Celtic designs that I have used abundantly. In that book, the designs are hand-drawn, the symmetry is all off, and they require complete overhaul to be made to look regular, and to be perfectly symmetric. There's a lot of work involved in making high-quality Celtic stained glass patterns even though I start with a cartoon. I should scan one up to show you what I've been using as starting points to the Celtic designs.

I've also used antique backs of chairs as inspiration - no kidding.

Some are very involved and come from my own drawings. Like the "Demeter and Persephone," the "Returning Angel," the "Sunflower Spirits," and countless others. Or even my photographs , I am a photo buff, I have a lot of them around.

I was also thinking of using photos from the rims of geysers for abstracts. Check out the actual photographs here: Link to My Yellowstone Photos.

You wouldn't know just from looking at the pretty pictures, but there is a lot of research, work and planning behind each one.

#3 Chantal

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 05:57 PM

Here. I superimposed one of the graphics from that book over the resulting pattern, which is perfectly radially symmetric on a 120 degree rotational axis.



#4 Chantal

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 07:29 PM

I just finished this one today:



And this is the wallpaper sample that it comes from:



You can see how small non-glass samples can be used a starting points.



#5 Jasmine

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 08:20 PM

Ah! Thanks for sharing the secrets!

#6 Spirit of the Moss

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 08:32 PM

You could argue that Art Nouveau was stolen from the Egyptians.

#7 Guest_strawberryblondie_*

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 10:21 PM

Now there is a woman with much talent, hats off to you girlfriend (Chantal), I would say "you da man" but you isn't a man ;)

Linda



#8 Audrey

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 07:42 AM

Your talent is amazing. You have a real gift.

#9 Chantal

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 09:44 AM

Thank you very much; but it's not so much the talent as the 16-hour workday, seven days a week.

Anyone wanting to draw patterns should take a look at Dover Publications PERMISSION FREE design series. They have a bewildering array of books that are dirt cheap.

Because they don't look immediately transferable to stained glass, they provide a hint of challenge that stimulates your skills, deepens your understanding of what constitutes elements of style, and even sometimes fires up your imagination.

There's a natural tendency for crafters to want patterns of {fill in the blank}. A pattern of a certain flower they like, or something relating to their hobbies, even though it may not be the sort of thing that looks good in glass. People wanting to make a gift, say, for their favorite pest control expert, may ask for a pattern of three roaches and a mousetrap!

The Dover books are really helpful in moving away from {fill in the blank} subject matter mindset, and free you do concentrate on style. To me, in some ways, that's closer to what glass is meant to be used for.

#10 Chantal

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 09:55 AM

While on the topic.

This is one of the patterns I made, inspired by the sculpted back of a Chippendale chair:



This one I completely made up, after making a these backs of chair patterns, just to show how one learns style elements through practice:



#11 Jasmine

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 01:18 PM

There's my post! It's been moved! Surprise! It turned into an interesting discussion. We don't always realize how much work goes into things, when all we see is the finished product. We can say, I like this one, I don't like that one, and not have a clue how much sweat goes into it.

Any more tips?

#12 Fox

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 03:49 PM


I would second Chantal's recomendation of the Dover books. In the 70's, when there were few suncatcher patterns (and some question as to whether a "serious" craftsman should have much interest in them) I found a Dover book of Chinese cut-paper designs. These lent themselves to being adapted to glass pretty well: although I only used a few outright, the care that went into crafting such "humble" items was instructive, and of course it got me thinking about how i could develop ideas from other sources. In connection with something that's come up on another thread, I recently found a 1975 Dover consisting of German cut-die silhouette patterns from the 1920's. While the technical aspects of crafting metal filigree and/or castings based on these would be a challenge, I would like to try it: who knows, there might be a market for lights or other things based around this. Anyway, to get back to the topic, you should certainly cast a broad net when it comes to finding visual inspiration: when you find something that"clicks", drawing up a pattern of your own can come a lot easier than you might think.

#13 Boris_USA

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 10:19 PM

QUOTE (Fox @ Dec 31 2008, 03:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
In connection with something that's come up on another thread, I recently found a 1975 Dover consisting of German cut-die silhouette patterns from the 1920's. While the technical aspects of crafting metal filigree and/or castings based on these would be a challenge, I would like to try it: who knows, there might be a market for lights or other things based around this.



There has always been a market for metal and glass combinations, and always will be. Its different, unusual, and takes more time to combine, so it will be sought after and attract attention. One does not need to have an elaborate setup to make metal enhancements. Metal die cut stampings make good models. They have been used for a hundred years on lighting. Die stampings where cheaper imitations and mass production versions used to copy the cast ornamentation. To the hobby person, now its easier to take the copy and cast the original quality version. Funny how that came full circle.

If anyone has the interest, I would be glad to take pictures and list the steps next time I have to duplicate an ornamental metal part.



#14 Rebecca

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 12:10 AM

Please, do, Boris!

Rebecca

#15 mozplay

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 08:41 PM

This is the part of the stained glass process that I have the most trepidation about. Like anyone else googling "stained glass" I came across Chantal's site(s) and was very impressed not only by the designs which to my amateur eye looked the most beautiful and intricate, but by the variety and sheer number of patterns. While I certainly plan to take advantage of the many 'free' samples offered on the web (I am in fact, hoping one of Chantal's will be my first) I do also hope to create my own designs one day. While I know that with practice, I will be able to construct a stained glass panel - the idea of taking an idea, emotion, or image and turning that into a pattern worthy of being put on a panel .. well.. that's a daunting notion indeed!


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Posted 20 March 2009 - 11:08 PM

moz, as a pattern creator myself I can assure you that it may seem daunting at first but it really isn't that difficult. Start simple and work your way up. Learning to turn art into something cut-able is the hardest part I think. I say, just jump in there and start drawing :)

Linda


QUOTE (mozplay @ Mar 20 2009, 06:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This is the part of the stained glass process that I have the most trepidation about. Like anyone else googling "stained glass" I came across Chantal's site(s) and was very impressed not only by the designs which to my amateur eye looked the most beautiful and intricate, but by the variety and sheer number of patterns. While I certainly plan to take advantage of the many 'free' samples offered on the web (I am in fact, hoping one of Chantal's will be my first) I do also hope to create my own designs one day. While I know that with practice, I will be able to construct a stained glass panel - the idea of taking an idea, emotion, or image and turning that into a pattern worthy of being put on a panel .. well.. that's a daunting notion indeed!



#17 Fox

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 11:53 PM

QUOTE (Boris_USA @ Dec 31 2008, 07:19 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
There has always been a market for metal and glass combinations, and always will be. Its different, unusual, and takes more time to combine, so it will be sought after and attract attention. One does not need to have an elaborate setup to make metal enhancements. Metal die cut stampings make good models. They have been used for a hundred years on lighting. Die stampings where cheaper imitations and mass production versions used to copy the cast ornamentation. To the hobby person, now its easier to take the copy and cast the original quality version. Funny how that came full circle.

If anyone has the interest, I would be glad to take pictures and list the steps next time I have to duplicate an ornamental metal part.

I also would be interested in this. You make a good point in that what is impractical or overly expensive for a manufacturer can be the opposite for an individual.

#18 John

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 02:06 PM

Still reading old posts.

 

"If anyone has the interest, I would be glad to take pictures and list the steps next time I have to duplicate an ornamental metal part."

 

Boris,  have you posted the steps?  If so,if you can find the link I would enjoy reading more.



#19 Boris_USA

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 11:49 AM

Still reading old posts.

 

"If anyone has the interest, I would be glad to take pictures and list the steps next time I have to duplicate an ornamental metal part."

 

Boris,  have you posted the steps?  If so,if you can find the link I would enjoy reading more.

 

I believe I did write a post on that, but have no idea as to where it was or in what topic Thread I wrote it in. . This is such an old thread its hard to remember all the details.
 






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