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Removing Old Putty From Window Frame


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#1 GAIA

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 05:08 PM

Hi all,

I want to remove some old putty from my door window frames. I've read that one can use a soldering iron to heat up the putty, then it becomes quite easy to scrape off. Will my SG soldering iron be too hot for this job? I've recently stripped the outside of the door to bare pine, undercoated and repainted it. I wouldn't want the heat from the iron to mess the finish on the outside of the door. See photo of glass here http://stainedglasst..._486_331291.jpg
and http://stainedglasst..._486_281427.jpg
The glass that is in is replacement glass and not set in the putty.

Any advice would be welcome.
Thanx.

#2 Bilbenglass

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 01:44 PM

I have done this before but used a heavy duty heat gun. Like a hairdryer on steroids. The putty became quite soft and scraped up easily with a putty knife. Anything remaining was cleaned up with fine sandpaper. Remembering what the putty was like when soft I think the SG soldering iron would be tricky to use and not set the putty to smoking. It was very quick from start to soft so the direct heat from the iron may be too much.

Maybe find a broken window at a junkyard and try it? It is always best to do some things twice where the second time is the one that counts. I always like to practice.

Cheers!
Bill

#3 Tod Beall

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 11:01 AM

I think Bill is right. The iron method will be messy and hard to control. A heat gun works quite well, but a little damage to the finished parts is possible.
Chipping the putty out with a sharpened putty knife or "beater" chisel will work, too.
Practice is a good thing. Good luck & have fun - Tod

#4 GAIA

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 11:44 AM

QUOTE (Bilbenglass @ Mar 24 2009, 02:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have done this before but used a heavy duty heat gun. Like a hairdryer on steroids. The putty became quite soft and scraped up easily with a putty knife. Anything remaining was cleaned up with fine sandpaper. Remembering what the putty was like when soft I think the SG soldering iron would be tricky to use and not set the putty to smoking. It was very quick from start to soft so the direct heat from the iron may be too much.

Maybe find a broken window at a junkyard and try it? It is always best to do some things twice where the second time is the one that counts. I always like to practice.

Cheers!
Bill

Thanks, though I think using a heat gun, will mess the new paint on the outside of the door. I will try the soldering iron, and will be careful with it.

#5 GAIA

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 11:46 AM

QUOTE (Tod Beall @ Mar 25 2009, 12:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I think Bill is right. The iron method will be messy and hard to control. A heat gun works quite well, but a little damage to the finished parts is possible.
Chipping the putty out with a sharpened putty knife or "beater" chisel will work, too.
Practice is a good thing. Good luck & have fun - Tod

Hi,
As in other reply, " Thanks, though I think using a heat gun, will mess the new paint on the outside of the door. I will try the soldering iron, and will be careful with it." If I try chopping out, again might mess new paint on outside of door. Might also cause cracks to appear in paint over door joints.




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