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Glass Plating


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#1 shad

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 08:36 PM

I saw my first 'plated' window this Spring. The look has stuck with me ... so much that not only did I buy some 'beginner' and not-so beginner patterns but I called Barry Masser. He is wonderful by the way - took a lot of time to answer my elementary questions.

I want to start a plated window soon but am still a bit intimidated by it. I'm curious - who else has done glass plating? Did you design your own patterns? Any tidbits of wisdom for a first timer?

#2 Dawnt

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 05:50 AM

I've done a few pieces with plating. Nothing too extensive...mainly background landscape elements. I'm certainly no expert, but learned a few things through trial and error. I do all my own patterns.

Use thin foil and be sparing with the flux and solder...and be certain the glass is very clean and dry before soldering on the plates, as cleaning between the pieces after the fact will be nearly impossible. If your back plated piece needs to be within the lines of a shape in front, cut it about 1/8" smaller that the front piece and try to solder it just on the inside edge of the lead lines on front piece. That way, you won't get shadows from the plating cast beyond your front lines.

Plating will also make a piece more prone to breaking, as the weight of the plates puts added stress on the front glass. Be sure your pattern is structurally sound and avoid moving it around much at all once the plating is on. Try to keep the plating somewhat balanced if it is a large panel.

That's all I can think of for now. Once you get started, if a specific question comes up, be sure to ask. Let us know how it goes!

Dawn

#3 GlassJaw

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 08:37 AM

I gotta ask; what is glass plating?

#4 shad

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 08:54 AM

Glassplating is the 'layering' of glass to achieve a more painted look.

Here is the website where I started after seeing a piece in a window:

http://www.glassplating.com

#5 GlassJaw

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 09:09 PM

Not sure I understand exactly how it works, but the results look pretty darn good.

#6 Flux

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Posted 16 June 2009 - 01:45 PM

QUOTE (GlassJaw @ Jun 15 2009, 09:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Not sure I understand exactly how it works, but the results look pretty darn good.



Check out also Bob Oddy's web site. He is a modern master at plating. Also contains a great article on technique.

http://www.robertoddy.com/default.html



#7 Rebecca

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 09:46 AM

Shad, I have some of Barry Masser's books and I have taught classes using them. As you said, he is very helpful and even helped me with the classes. I also have repaired pieces that were plated. Sometimes plating can actually help the stability of a window. I have used plating on a couple of designs, also. Nothing big, though.

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#8 Bluestem Arts

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 10:21 AM

couple of questions:
a). If I'm back-plating to an edge of the design, what heart depth of lead u-came do you use to accomodate the added thickness - or do you wrap the edges in foil and use a wood frame

b). what glass is used in front to give a ghosty appearance - seems difficult to find something with just enough opacity to provide the shadow affect without creating too much darkness.

#9 Dawnt

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 06:08 AM

Youghiogheny Ice White is great glass for for the ghostly effects. It has a nice opaque white look when not backlit, but amazing light transmissions, so you can clearly see the details of your plating once the light hits it.

http://www.youghiogh...ippleglass1.htm

#10 Rebecca

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Posted 20 June 2009 - 07:32 AM

QUOTE (Bluestem Arts @ Jun 17 2009, 11:21 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
couple of questions:
a). If I'm back-plating to an edge of the design, what heart depth of lead u-came do you use to accomodate the added thickness - or do you wrap the edges in foil and use a wood frame

b). what glass is used in front to give a ghosty appearance - seems difficult to find something with just enough opacity to provide the shadow affect without creating too much darkness.


There are various ways of dealing with extra layers at the edge. Barry Masser says to put a single layer boarder around everything. If you have two layers at some places around the border, you can also make your own "high heart" came. You can put came on each piece of glass to be plated and solder them together when you place the second piece of glass. Or you can cut the leaves off and "nest" the came - slide the heart of one piece into the heart of the other piece.

Rebecca




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