Jump to content


Photo

Go Kiln Go


  • Please log in to reply
38 replies to this topic

#21 Chantal

Chantal

    Prophet

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,794 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Montreal
  • Interests:Orchids, gardening, badminton, drawing stained glass patterns, bird feeding, webmastering.

Posted 09 September 2009 - 05:21 PM

Well maybe I'll use rent the big kiln at the glass school and do them all in one go...

Let them deal with the fire!

What we're missing here is a smiley with a flamethrower.

#22 Boris_USA

Boris_USA

    Lampman

  • Assistant Administrator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,611 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Shore of Maryland USA
  • Interests:Way too Many...

Posted 09 September 2009 - 10:56 PM

Well maybe I'll use rent the big kiln at the glass school and do them all in one go...

Let them deal with the fire!

What we're missing here is a smiley with a flamethrower.


With those molds, I would think you could deal with the wax before you do the kiln thing. Steam does a good job on wax, and no fires. Not sure if your mold material would take it, You could likely burn whats left out, with a propane torch too, outside someplace, where there is no fire hazzard, and then do the final burn out in the kiln. Its not like your trying to get rid of a pound of wax. Had good luck with small cavity molds, using a steam machine to get rid of the wax, so I imagine it would work on open face molds too.

#23 Chantal

Chantal

    Prophet

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,794 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Montreal
  • Interests:Orchids, gardening, badminton, drawing stained glass patterns, bird feeding, webmastering.

Posted 10 September 2009 - 02:32 PM

A torch! Brilliant, that should work.

#24 Dennis Brady

Dennis Brady

    Curmudgeon

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,081 posts

Posted 10 September 2009 - 05:08 PM

A torch! Brilliant, that should work.


Be careful. Applying heat in a concentrated area can easily crack molds.

#25 Boris_USA

Boris_USA

    Lampman

  • Assistant Administrator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,611 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Shore of Maryland USA
  • Interests:Way too Many...

Posted 10 September 2009 - 06:33 PM

Be careful. Applying heat in a concentrated area can easily crack molds.


Good point. I would heat the whole mold as even as I could, at least long enough to let it expand naturally, if it was inclined to do so. Also, make sure the mold is good and dry, or it may pop-chip like concrete, under focused heat in one area.

A home made mold steamer can be made from an old pressure cooker pot. Then all you need is a small hotplate. You take out the vent in the lid, and replace it with a "T" nipple. The male end should screw right in the pot lid, the valve should screw into one of the holes, fitting made for a hose should screw right in the last hole. . I used a brass fitting, that screwed right into the hole, found at an auto supply store. (NAPA) the nipple had about a 3/8 hole in it, and I added a section of hose from a pressure washer (and clamped it with two hose clamps). Heating the pot gradually, it will make steam and force it out the hose. You adjust the heat to get a decent stream of steam, and if its a cavity mold, the hose can be put in the pour hole, with a drain hole in another area. The steam should seperate the wax from the mold and wash it out.

You have to keep in mind that this is real steam, and caution has to be used, since it can burn you, and the hose will get hot. You also dont want to turn the heat up to produce rocket power steam pressure. Its not like you want to steam clean an engine. You should wear face protection, kiln or welding gloves, and a canvas or rubber apron. If you dont understand the principles and think protection is not needed in your case, do not even attempt it. You will be an accident waiting for a place to happen. Working with steam is just as hazzardous as working with molten metal or glass. BE AWARE! I found a real steam machine at an auction, and replaced my steam pot.

#26 Chantal

Chantal

    Prophet

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,794 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Montreal
  • Interests:Orchids, gardening, badminton, drawing stained glass patterns, bird feeding, webmastering.

Posted 20 December 2009 - 09:55 PM

FINALLY!!!!

I got around to calling an electrician, the kiln is now working and has gone through its first load. Soon I will have pictures to post.

#27 Chantal

Chantal

    Prophet

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,794 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Montreal
  • Interests:Orchids, gardening, badminton, drawing stained glass patterns, bird feeding, webmastering.

Posted 20 January 2010 - 05:07 PM

I've been heating to 1250 and finding that the kiln wash leaves imprints on the back of my glass, so I'm reducing the firing temp to 1230. I'll see if it's better!

#28 Dennis Brady

Dennis Brady

    Curmudgeon

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,081 posts

Posted 20 January 2010 - 06:21 PM

I've been heating to 1250 and finding that the kiln wash leaves imprints on the back of my glass, so I'm reducing the firing temp to 1230. I'll see if it's better!


You can even pick up some texture at 1200. The best way to minimize texture on the glass is to minimize it on the KW. You can smooth it off a lot if, after the last coat of KW is thoroughly dried, you wipe with a sponge soaked with warm water.

You are on the right track to reduce texture. A longer hold at a lower temperature will reduce texture. However, longer holds at lower temperature increase the likelihood of the glass sliding out of position and settling unevenly in the mold. Take special care to be sure your kiln is perfectly level.

#29 Chantal

Chantal

    Prophet

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,794 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Montreal
  • Interests:Orchids, gardening, badminton, drawing stained glass patterns, bird feeding, webmastering.

Posted 21 January 2010 - 10:31 AM

You can pick up texture at 1200? Mmmm... I'm going to turn it down to 1200 and see what happens.

Would a fiber kiln shelf mat help any?

#30 Chantal

Chantal

    Prophet

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,794 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Montreal
  • Interests:Orchids, gardening, badminton, drawing stained glass patterns, bird feeding, webmastering.

Posted 21 January 2010 - 11:30 AM

I checked out Thin Fire paper... oh my, expensive! 100 sheets for $180 USD...

Maybe 1/8" Fiberfrax mat will be better...

#31 shad

shad

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Location:Tennessee

Posted 21 January 2010 - 03:06 PM

$180?! Oh my! I don't mean that in a bad way either. I have been paying $4.29 a sheet locally and haven't seen it cheaper than $249 per 100 sheets anywhere. But, I do like it. I started out with my first firing having thinfire on my kiln shelf so I don't know any better - hehe.

#32 Dennis Brady

Dennis Brady

    Curmudgeon

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,081 posts

Posted 21 January 2010 - 03:40 PM

I checked out Thin Fire paper... oh my, expensive! 100 sheets for $180 USD...

Maybe 1/8" Fiberfrax mat will be better...


You won't get a totally smooth finish on thinfire either.

The smoothest finish I've ever achieved was from "flip 'n fire". Fire the fuse upside down, flip it over and do a very high speed firing (1200F dph to 1300F after 20 min hold at 1000F) to fire polish. The heat is enough to fire polish the top but the glass isn't at the upper temperature long enough to pick up texture underneath.

I've also been experimenting with firing onto float glass. Wonderfully smooth bottom finish but (at least so far) erratic thermal shock cracks. Experiments continue.

#33 Chantal

Chantal

    Prophet

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,794 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Montreal
  • Interests:Orchids, gardening, badminton, drawing stained glass patterns, bird feeding, webmastering.

Posted 21 January 2010 - 04:03 PM

The thing is, I did not see any such markings on the glass' underside when I took classes.

#34 Dennis Brady

Dennis Brady

    Curmudgeon

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,081 posts

Posted 22 January 2010 - 06:29 PM

The thing is, I did not see any such markings on the glass' underside when I took classes.


I can offer no explanation for that. I've never had a firing totally devoid of some marking.

#35 Chantal

Chantal

    Prophet

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,794 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Montreal
  • Interests:Orchids, gardening, badminton, drawing stained glass patterns, bird feeding, webmastering.

Posted 29 January 2010 - 11:33 AM

1200 F works!!! Ooo-wee.

The kind folks of Northern Heat were generous enough to send me a sample of their high performance kiln shelf liner. The glass painting firing temps are probably on the high end of the product's tolerance. I cut out a piece to leave in the kiln to see how long it would last under "glass painting conditions."

The kiln is running quite a bit. My husband insisted I keep it at my mom's because he fears fire (she's a 30 minute drive), and it has fostered even deeper harmony between my mom and I. :peace: We're thinking of planning a trip to Iceland or Scotland as the glass bakes.

Good things all around.

#36 Rebecca

Rebecca

    Restaurateur

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,076 posts
  • Location:Kingsport

Posted 29 January 2010 - 06:56 PM

1200 F works!!! Ooo-wee.

The kind folks of Northern Heat were generous enough to send me a sample of their high performance kiln shelf liner. The glass painting firing temps are probably on the high end of the product's tolerance. I cut out a piece to leave in the kiln to see how long it would last under "glass painting conditions."

The kiln is running quite a bit. My husband insisted I keep it at my mom's because he fears fire (she's a 30 minute drive), and it has fostered even deeper harmony between my mom and I. :peace: We're thinking of planning a trip to Iceland or Scotland as the glass bakes.

Good things all around.


Chantal, I don't think you have time to go to either of those places as the glass bakes. The glass will be BURNED before you get back! :jester: I'm glad you found the right temperature and hold time for your kiln. It's possible, but it's not always easy.

Rebecca

#37 Stephen Richard

Stephen Richard

    Real Estate Agent

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 579 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Interests:Leaded and stained glass, kiln forming, sandblasting, acid etching, restoration

Posted 30 January 2010 - 03:44 AM

.............The kiln is running quite a bit. My husband insisted I keep it at my mom's because he fears fire (she's a 30 minute drive), and it has fostered even deeper harmony between my mom and I. :peace: We're thinking of planning a trip to Iceland or Scotland as the glass bakes.

Good things all around.

So he doesn't mind if byu burn you mothers house down?
If you plan a trip to Scotland, I would be happy to help. I can show you round my studio and the highlights of Glasgow.
Steve

#38 Dawnt

Dawnt

    Mister Sister

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,338 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NY

Posted 30 January 2010 - 06:57 AM

You can pick up texture at 1200? Mmmm... I'm going to turn it down to 1200 and see what happens.

Would a fiber kiln shelf mat help any?



Nope. My big fiber kiln leaves much heavier impressions than a well prepped ceramic kiln shelf. To combat that, I used 1/8" fiber blanket rolled with a rolling pin and shelf paper over that. Still get some impression, but not as much. The smoothest result is with kiln wash applied with a GOOD sumi brush.

#39 Chantal

Chantal

    Prophet

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,794 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Montreal
  • Interests:Orchids, gardening, badminton, drawing stained glass patterns, bird feeding, webmastering.

Posted 04 February 2010 - 04:25 PM

Yeah Stephen, my husband doesn't mind if his mother-in-law roasts or fries, as long as she's crisp at the end, haha.

You'll definitely be on the itinerary should we find our way to Glasgow!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users