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Need Frame Advice For Pool Table Light


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#1 Jamie

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 01:24 PM

I'm a beginner at stained glass, but I'm hoping to make a light for my husband's pool table. I've done a few projects so far that have turned out well, but my question is - How do I have to frame such a long project? Rough dimensions are 60" long x 18" high x 18" wide. I've seen some retail lamps that are framed with metal angle-iron, some with wood frames, and some that look like they have no frame at all. My first choice would be no frame, then metal, last choice would be wood unless it's just a LOT less hassle.
I plan on making 4 panels (it will be a rectangle light, not oval), but I'm looking for suggestions on how to put them together at the corners. Is reinforcement needed?
Here's a link to a lights I'm using as inspiration. The pattern will be different (I'm putting our last name instead of 'billilards' and scattering the balls around, etc.) but you get the idea.
http://www.rockwellb...FL460EBANT2.jpg
http://www.billiards...ht-2-detail.jpg

Thanks for any advice or links to needed products,
Jamie

#2 Dennis Brady

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 03:24 PM

I'm a beginner at stained glass, but I'm hoping to make a light for my husband's pool table. I've done a few projects so far that have turned out well, but my question is - How do I have to frame such a long project? Rough dimensions are 60" long x 18" high x 18" wide. I've seen some retail lamps that are framed with metal angle-iron, some with wood frames, and some that look like they have no frame at all. My first choice would be no frame, then metal, last choice would be wood unless it's just a LOT less hassle.
I plan on making 4 panels (it will be a rectangle light, not oval), but I'm looking for suggestions on how to put them together at the corners. Is reinforcement needed?
Here's a link to a lights I'm using as inspiration. The pattern will be different (I'm putting our last name instead of 'billilards' and scattering the balls around, etc.) but you get the idea.
http://www.rockwellbilliards.com/images/products/FL460EBANT2.jpg
http://www.billiards.com/img/ram-gameroom-products-green-purple-red-trim-billiards-light-2-detail.jpg

Thanks for any advice or links to needed products,
Jamie


Zinc along top and bottom rim.
Imbed brass rod into solder on inside corners.
Brass restrip (or reforce lead) for all vertical seams.

#3 Boris_USA

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 05:43 PM

I'm a beginner at stained glass, but I'm hoping to make a light for my husband's pool table. I've done a few projects so far that have turned out well, but my question is - How do I have to frame such a long project? Rough dimensions are 60" long x 18" high x 18" wide.


I have had a dozen or more Pool Table Lamps, in different workmanship, but all of them had one thing in common. A solid frame at the top, just under the crown, that was inside the top opening, all the way around. Some did use a zinc bar, on its end, bent around the inside of the top. Everything was soldered and supported by this frame, and there are usually 3 flat bars, about 2 or so inches wide, soldered across the center of this frame. One in the center, and one on each side, toward the ends. Holes where drilled in these and the sockets for the fixtures where fastened here. Most have 3 bulbs. Two chains holding it up from the end flat frames, and the top of the sockets are normal hangers. I would use at least a 3/4 zinc flat, on its end, for the top frame. This seems to be the most critical area that supports all the weight. The crown would be soldered to the top of the frame, at the top of the shade. Then, Like Dennis suggested, the rest of it can be re-enforced with materials he listed.

#4 bruin

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 04:31 PM

Jamie -

Did you ever complete this project? I'm new to stained glass as well and a pool table light is my target project right now. I'd love to hear how yours went. Or if anybody else has any comments/suggestions it would be great to revive this discussion.

Dennis/Boris -

I'm unfamiliar with using zinc bars. Can you elaborate on it workability, where I'd find it, and any other advice?

Thanks in advance!

#5 Boris_USA

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 12:36 AM

Jamie -

I'm unfamiliar with using zinc bars. Can you elaborate on it workability, where I'd find it, and any other advice?

Thanks in advance!


I call them zinc bars, but some call it re-bar. Its found at most glass shops, and is usually a zinc coated mild steel bar. It bends like any other mild steel, and comes in two widths I have seen, like 3/8ths and 1/2 inch. Solder sticks well to it. A pool table lamp has quite a bit of weight, when done, and usually fails at the crown seam, if not properly supported, since everything pulls down on that part. They usually hang by two hangers, one on each end, and a normal one has 3 cross bars or "flats" about 2 inches wide, soldered across the top frame, inside the crown. These are drilled for lamp sockets, and the two end ones support the chain or hangers as well.

#6 bruin

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 01:42 PM

I call them zinc bars, but some call it re-bar. Its found at most glass shops, and is usually a zinc coated mild steel bar. It bends like any other mild steel, and comes in two widths I have seen, like 3/8ths and 1/2 inch. Solder sticks well to it. A pool table lamp has quite a bit of weight, when done, and usually fails at the crown seam, if not properly supported, since everything pulls down on that part. They usually hang by two hangers, one on each end, and a normal one has 3 cross bars or "flats" about 2 inches wide, soldered across the top frame, inside the crown. These are drilled for lamp sockets, and the two end ones support the chain or hangers as well.


I'll look into these Boris. Thanks very much for the lead. I really appreciate it.




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