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Difference Between Plumber's Solder And Stained Glass Solder?


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#1 Gigi

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 02:19 PM

I've just inherited about 50 rolls of solder from my Dad's stained glass hobby. He was a pipefitter by trade so there's a lot of plumber's solder here as well as MANY other different types. My question, can I use this or any type of solder for my stained glass art projects or can I ONLY use solder marked specifically for stained glass? Many thanks - love this website.

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#2 Chantal

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 07:27 PM

You shouldn't use rosin-core solder.

Is that plumber's solder 60-40?

#3 Gigi

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 08:12 PM

You shouldn't use rosin-core solder.

Is that plumber's solder 60-40?



#4 Gigi

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 08:15 PM

Thanks for your reply! None of it says rosin core solder. Most of it says solid wire solder, 40/60, 50/50, 60/40. Does it have to say stained glass solder on the label?


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#5 Boris_USA

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 10:36 PM

Thanks for your reply! None of it says rosin core solder. Most of it says solid wire solder, 40/60, 50/50, 60/40. Does it have to say stained glass solder on the label?


Gigi


Solder is solder. Plumbers solder is not usually filled with any flux agent, so its cool to use. There is no special difference between 50/50 stained glass solder or 50/50 plumbers solder, no more than the difference between a wooden 2X4 used in your house wall, or used in your Gazeebo. Its still a 2X4, just used in a different place. They put "Stained Glass" on the roll so they can cahrge you more for it..

Rosin core solder is mostly used in the electrical/electronic field, and acid core solder is used mostly in metal/mechanical shop work, where dirty surfaces are more common. Neither of these works well with stained glass. However, I do use Rosin Core solder to tack solder pieces, where it may be a while before the final soldering is done, since its not real prone to oxidation (white film) that accumulates on exposed solder, and Can be difficult to solder over, if it sits way too long.

#6 Gigi

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 12:41 AM

Thank you so much, Lampman! Enough solder to last quite some time!

#7 Stacey

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 09:43 AM

"They put "Stained Glass" on the roll so they can charge you more for it.."

So does this mean that I get the solder I need at the home improvement store/hardwarde/plumbing supply places? Hm. That's interesting. And way cheaper. Thanks again for the info Boris!

#8 Tod Beall

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 09:44 AM

You may find the 40/60 harder to use. Test first as it will require more heat to melt than 50/50 or 60/40. - Tod

#9 Boris_USA

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 10:33 PM

"They put "Stained Glass" on the roll so they can charge you more for it.."

So does this mean that I get the solder I need at the home improvement store/hardwarde/plumbing supply places? Hm. That's interesting. And way cheaper. Thanks again for the info Boris!


Exactly. If it has the same content or mixture, such as 50/50, or 60/40, its the same, regardless of whats on the label, "For Stained Glass" or whatever. These sellers know they can get more money from us, than they can from other trades people. They are selling more "perception" than they are the product. It all falls under the "General Pupose" category. Just be sure its solid wire solder, and has no "core" contents, which will be listed on the label.

And as Tod says, the 40/60 is not the same as 60/40. The tin and lead content is reversed. The 40/60 will require a bit more heat, and would not be best suited for foil work. I have used it with good results for tinning outside edges of small pieces and for soldering metal pieces on lamp shades, like the cross bars on tops. Play with it, and try it on some different places. All solder has its uses, and some works better for different purposes.

#10 Neptunia

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 03:41 PM

What is wrong with using the hardware store rosin-core solder? Does it have anything to do with the hideous brown muck that emerges and is incredibly hard to clean off?

#11 Boris_USA

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 12:41 AM

What is wrong with using the hardware store rosin-core solder? Does it have anything to do with the hideous brown muck that emerges and is incredibly hard to clean off?


Thats exactly whats wrong with it. We add our own fluxes that dont smoke and bubble, or leave that gook all over your project. The rosin is flux, but made for applications where corrosion is a no-no at all, like electrical connections. I do use it for tack soldering, when I expect the project to take a long time. Find it does not corrode easily or allow oxidation quickly




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