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I Am Trying To Make A Jewelry Box, Can't Get The Hinges Right


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#1 jdftwrth

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Posted 20 January 2011 - 03:08 PM

Hi,

I am trying to make a jewelry box and every thing is great but when i try to cut the brass rod and tubing that I am using as the hinge, things go off the deep end. So far I have bent and flattened 3 feet of brass tubing, trying to cut it, the brass rod that was supposed to fit inside the tubing it bent in every angle imaginable except 90 degrees.

So is the a tubing bending and cutting 101 class? Or can someone point me in the right direction?

Thanks...


BTW this is the most expensive hobby i have ever had, but I have to much invested to stop now.

#2 Stephen Richard

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Posted 20 January 2011 - 04:08 PM

Hi,

I am trying to make a jewelry box and every thing is great but when i try to cut the brass rod and tubing that I am using as the hinge, things go off the deep end. So far I have bent and flattened 3 feet of brass tubing, trying to cut it, the brass rod that was supposed to fit inside the tubing it bent in every angle imaginable except 90 degrees.

So is the a tubing bending and cutting 101 class? Or can someone point me in the right direction?

Thanks...


BTW this is the most expensive hobby i have ever had, but I have to much invested to stop now.


I think the use of a fine toothed hacksaw with minimum pressure will enable you to cut the tube without crushing. You will find that a small rats tail file will be of assistance to remove the burrs.

#3 eggguy254

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Posted 20 January 2011 - 10:15 PM

Hi,

I am trying to make a jewelry box and every thing is great but when i try to cut the brass rod and tubing that I am using as the hinge, things go off the deep end. So far I have bent and flattened 3 feet of brass tubing, trying to cut it, the brass rod that was supposed to fit inside the tubing it bent in every angle imaginable except 90 degrees.

So is the a tubing bending and cutting 101 class? Or can someone point me in the right direction?

Thanks...


BTW this is the most expensive hobby i have ever had, but I have to much invested to stop now.


Two things...

First, I cut tube hinges with a Dremel tool with a cutting wheel. Cuts right through it without smashing it.

Second, I don't use the inside rod with my hinges. I use an appropriately sized copper wire that I run through the tube. It gives me much more flexibility and doesn't create any waste. I can cut the tube to any size without worrying if I'm going to have enough of the core rod.

#4 glassiquegirl

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 03:20 AM

When I was making box hinges, all I used (cheap and worked perfect) was an exacto knife, laid the tube on my bench and started rolling the tubing with the knife blade, basically scoring the tubing where you wanted it cut, as it was rolled back and forth. You don't have to apply much pressure, but continue rolling and scoring until its almost through the tube, then it will just snap off with your hands. Easy, cheap and never a crushed tube.

#5 Boris_USA

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 12:51 PM

When I was making box hinges, all I used (cheap and worked perfect) was an exacto knife, laid the tube on my bench and started rolling the tubing with the knife blade, basically scoring the tubing where you wanted it cut, as it was rolled back and forth. You don't have to apply much pressure, but continue rolling and scoring until its almost through the tube, then it will just snap off with your hands. Easy, cheap and never a crushed tube.


If using this method, you can always insert the inside rod into the tubing while making the cut, which keeps it from crushing too.

#6 jdftwrth

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 01:46 PM

All -

I want to thank all those who took the time out of their probably busy schedules to offer some suggestions on this vexing problem.

Of course the folks i buy my glass from may be a little disappointed (seeing as I am one of their best customers)but I made up my mind when I started down this path that I would succeed.

JD

#7 CJB

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Posted 14 June 2011 - 10:13 PM

Hi,

I am trying to make a jewelry box and every thing is great but when i try to cut the brass rod and tubing that I am using as the hinge, things go off the deep end. So far I have bent and flattened 3 feet of brass tubing, trying to cut it, the brass rod that was supposed to fit inside the tubing it bent in every angle imaginable except 90 degrees.

So is the a tubing bending and cutting 101 class? Or can someone point me in the right direction?

Thanks...


BTW this is the most expensive hobby i have ever had, but I have to much invested to stop now.



#8 CJB

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Posted 14 June 2011 - 10:17 PM

Did you master your hinge on your stained glass jewelry box? If not, I might be able to help you. Boxes and hinges can be a little complicated but with a little guidance you can do it.

#9 jdftwrth

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 04:34 AM

Did you master your hinge on your stained glass jewelry box? If not, I might be able to help you. Boxes and hinges can be a little complicated but with a little guidance you can do it.


CJB -

Yes, using a little from all the ideas offered in this thread I got the hinges to work properly. I won't be forgetting this lesson anytime soon. I went off on a tangent for a while and just focused on putting hinges together using scrap window glass until I could do it correctly.

I am now focusing on my soldering techniques, my other major weakness. My better half says I am to fussy but I feel that if your going to do something then do it till your happy with it.

Thanks,

JD

#10 Larry from BC

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 01:43 PM

David Gomm Stained Glass in Prevost just outside Salt Lake City has a great article with pics on this subject on their web site. The hinges are made just like three part door hinges. Check it out. BTW I make a large number of boxes for craft fairs etc and although a fine tooth hack saw and a good miter box work well the little mini Chop Saw at Harbor Freight for $24 sure works a lot better. Buy a small deburring tool at a tool supply and a fine tooth smallish flat file and you are set. I insert the inner tube and cut both to length at the same time as per the above mentioned video.
Just my thoughts.




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