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Which Type Of Paint To Stain ?


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#1 Maverick27

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 05:00 AM

Hi - Tiffany lamps are just absolutely gorgeous, eye-catching lamps. I recently purchased a DragonFly style & come to realise that they are'nt very difficult construct from scratch. I live in Kenya, can anyone pls tell me which kind of paint that i can use to stain the glass ?
Reason for asking, i'm pretty sure that i won't be able to find any Color Enamel (powder colors)locally. Can i use "acrylic paint" to stain the glass or any other paint that is readily available ? Where would be the best place to look the paints - local stationary shop or hardware shop ?

Thanks - Mave

#2 Rebecca

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 09:02 AM

Tiffany lamps have no stain. The lamp shade is made of many pieces of colored glass. The color is made in the glass when it is manufactured.

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#3 Maverick27

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 09:19 AM

Thanks - assuming i want to stain the glass myself, since i want build the lamps from scratch.

#4 Rebecca

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 01:03 PM

Thanks - assuming i want to stain the glass myself, since i want build the lamps from scratch.


Exactly! You don't make the glass. The glass is already made in different colors. You cut the different colors and solder the pieces together to make the lamp shade. That is how a Tiffany lamp shade is made from scratch. "Scratch" in this case is the already-made glass.

To make glass from scratch, you would start with sand, alkalies, and metal oxides to make the different colors. Then you would heat it all up to a couple thousand degrees Fahrenheit. Then roll it out to a sheet and anneal it in a big kiln.

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#5 Stephen Richard

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 05:43 PM

Being in Kenya, I make the assumption that Maverick27 has a limited range of coloured glass and would like to extend the range of colour. May or may not be right, but I am not assuming the person is a complete novice.

So..No acrylic paint will not do, as it will be quickly affected by the heat and peel away from the glass in a year or two.

You need vitreous paints or ceramic on glaze colours. If you do not have access to stained glass suppliers in Kenya, you should try ceramic suppliers. On glaze colours are low firing vitreous paints that are designed to go over already glazed objects. Their firing ranges are specified. You should try for ones designed to cure below 800C.

South Africa may be a source for glass stainers paints. They are not heavy and so could be sent without great difficulty.

I understand that not ever4y part of the world has the resources of the USA.

#6 Rebecca

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 08:10 PM

Being in Kenya, I make the assumption that Maverick27 has a limited range of coloured glass and would like to extend the range of colour. May or may not be right, but I am not assuming the person is a complete novice.

So..No acrylic paint will not do, as it will be quickly affected by the heat and peel away from the glass in a year or two.

You need vitreous paints or ceramic on glaze colours. If you do not have access to stained glass suppliers in Kenya, you should try ceramic suppliers. On glaze colours are low firing vitreous paints that are designed to go over already glazed objects. Their firing ranges are specified. You should try for ones designed to cure below 800C.

South Africa may be a source for glass stainers paints. They are not heavy and so could be sent without great difficulty.

I understand that not ever4y part of the world has the resources of the USA.



That is true, but a Tiffany style lamp depends on opalescent glass and you can't stain glass opalescent. Also, from Mave's post it may be presumed that a paint that does not need to be fired in a kiln is desired. There is really not a readily available paint that will make a gorgeous Tiffany lamp shade.

Rebecca

#7 Maverick27

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 12:57 AM

Being in Kenya, I make the assumption that Maverick27 has a limited range of coloured glass and would like to extend the range of colour. May or may not be right, but I am not assuming the person is a complete novice.

So..No acrylic paint will not do, as it will be quickly affected by the heat and peel away from the glass in a year or two.

You need vitreous paints or ceramic on glaze colours. If you do not have access to stained glass suppliers in Kenya, you should try ceramic suppliers. On glaze colours are low firing vitreous paints that are designed to go over already glazed objects. Their firing ranges are specified. You should try for ones designed to cure below 800C.

South Africa may be a source for glass stainers paints. They are not heavy and so could be sent without great difficulty.

I understand that not ever4y part of the world has the resources of the USA.


Thanks Stephen - this is the answer i was looking for. Last qtn - do vitreuos paints give the translucent/clear effect on the glass once stained or does the glass become opaque ? What does "firing in a kiln" mean ? Is it a oven ? In putting the stained glass in the hot oven achieve the translucent effect ?

#8 Stephen Richard

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 02:58 AM

On glaze colours tend to be opaque, so the amount of translucency depends on the thickness of application.
Glass painters enamels can be either transparent or opaque.
A kiln is an insulated box that can be heated to temperatures way above a domestic oven - depending on the type up to 1500C. On glaze needs between 600C - 800C, glass painters enamels need between 540 and 580C.
A domestic oven will not achieve the temperatures required.

#9 Maverick27

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 08:46 AM

Can anyone recommend a good brand of vitreous paints ? Perhaps, something that is available in the UK. I have friends living there, who can courier it to me in Kenya.
I've heard Reuscheco have a good reputation.
http://www.reuscheco.com/Home.asp

#10 Rebecca

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 09:08 AM

Can anyone recommend a good brand of vitreous paints ? Perhaps, something that is available in the UK. I have friends living there, who can courier it to me in Kenya.
I've heard Reuscheco have a good reputation.
http://www.reuscheco.com/Home.asp




Yes, Reusche is a good place to get vitreous paints and enamels. You can order them from http://reuscheco.com/ But you are not going to get the effect you want with vitreous paints nor with glazes. Have your friends in England send you the glass you need.

Rebecca

#11 Stephen Richard

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 01:50 PM

Reusche, Degussa, and Rockingham are suitable brands
Suppliers range from Kansa Craft, Tempsford, Pearsons Glass, Creative Glass, etc.

We don't actually know what effect this person wants. It has been explained about the nature of the glass used in Tiffany style shades, and the person is still pursuing the idea of paint. So let's give her the chance.

#12 Rebecca

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 05:44 PM

Reusche, Degussa, and Rockingham are suitable brands
Suppliers range from Kansa Craft, Tempsford, Pearsons Glass, Creative Glass, etc.

We don't actually know what effect this person wants. It has been explained about the nature of the glass used in Tiffany style shades, and the person is still pursuing the idea of paint. So let's give her the chance.


I'm giving her a chance - that's why I gave her the link to Reusche. But it's hard to tell from a paint catalog what it will actually look like on the glass. I am trying to save her a lot of work and heartbreak. We DO know what she wants as she says, "Tiffany lamps are just absolutely gorgeous, eye-catching lamps... can anyone pls tell me which kind of paint that i can use to stain the glass?" Tiffany lamps depend on opalescent glass. Stain and enamels will not produce that look. They will either be flat, nearly opaque color or transparent color. She may spend a lot of money and time trying paints and stains and be terribly disappointed. It is always better to tell the truth.

Rebecca

#13 Maverick27

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 08:44 AM

I'm giving her a chance - that's why I gave her the link to Reusche. But it's hard to tell from a paint catalog what it will actually look like on the glass. I am trying to save her a lot of work and heartbreak. We DO know what she wants as she says, "Tiffany lamps are just absolutely gorgeous, eye-catching lamps... can anyone pls tell me which kind of paint that i can use to stain the glass?" Tiffany lamps depend on opalescent glass. Stain and enamels will not produce that look. They will either be flat, nearly opaque color or transparent color. She may spend a lot of money and time trying paints and stains and be terribly disappointed. It is always better to tell the truth.

Rebecca


Hi Folks - it's me again...sorry 4 being a nuisance. Am i correct to understand that "ALL" glass paint enamels (powder) "HAVE" to be fired in a kiln ?
I reiterate, i simply want to stain a plain, clear glass, leave it overnight (or 2) & assemble a Tiffany Lamp from it.
I'm geared towards buying enamels (powder) as opposed to Liquid, perhaps, they are more economical ?!

MAve

#14 Stephen Richard

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 01:36 PM

Hi Folks - it's me again...sorry 4 being a nuisance. Am i correct to understand that "ALL" glass paint enamels (powder) "HAVE" to be fired in a kiln ?
I reiterate, i simply want to stain a plain, clear glass, leave it overnight (or 2) & assemble a Tiffany Lamp from it.
I'm geared towards buying enamels (powder) as opposed to Liquid, perhaps, they are more economical ?!

MAve


Yes they have to be fired in a kiln. Oven fired "glass paints" will not stand up the heat of a light bulb.
If you really want to try painting clear glass for lamp shades, get opaque enamels to break up the light. The enamels will fire in a small kiln in a few hours.

#15 Rebecca

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 03:43 PM

Hi Folks - it's me again...sorry 4 being a nuisance. Am i correct to understand that "ALL" glass paint enamels (powder) "HAVE" to be fired in a kiln ?
I reiterate, i simply want to stain a plain, clear glass, leave it overnight (or 2) & assemble a Tiffany Lamp from it.
I'm geared towards buying enamels (powder) as opposed to Liquid, perhaps, they are more economical ?!

MAve


Perhaps you should post a picture of what you are calling a "Tiffany" lamp. And tell us how you are assembling the pieces. We might not be talking about the same thing. A Tiffany-style lamp shade usually has hundreds of pieces that are each wrapped in copper foil tape (around the edges) and soldered together on a mold. It is not an process that can be done in a day or two, especially by someone who has never made one before.

All of the paints, enamels, and stains that Stephen has recommended must be put in a kiln.

Rebecca

#16 Celeste

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 12:15 AM

If you have access to Pabeo Vitrae paints.....it can be applied to glass then "fired" in a household oven. I would think that having all of your pieces cut first would be advisable.




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