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Cutting Oil Alternatives For Toyo Handheld Cutters


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#1 Spudnique

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:02 AM

Is there an alternative to store bought cutting oil for handheld Toyo glass cutters?

In the past I would partially fill the cutter's reservoir.

However, I am wanting to change my ways, and will be putting the oil in a small glass jar that has a patch of unbleached cotton in it. I will use this to hold/store my handheld cutters in an upright position.

Thanks.

#2 wendy lee

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:17 AM

Is there an alternative to store bought cutting oil for handheld Toyo glass cutters?

In the past I would partially fill the cutter's reservoir.

However, I am wanting to change my ways, and will be putting the oil in a small glass jar that has a patch of unbleached cotton in it. I will use this to hold/store my handheld cutters in an upright position.

Thanks.


I don't fill either of mine. I'm a dipper.
I have a dollar store candle holder with a piece of sponge at the bottom to dip on. I rather like the idea of knowing every cut has oil on it. I've had my cutter run dry once. The score was...not so pretty!

#3 Spudnique

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:40 AM

I don't fill either of mine. I'm a dipper.
I have a dollar store candle holder with a piece of sponge at the bottom to dip on. I rather like the idea of knowing every cut has oil on it. I've had my cutter run dry once. The score was...not so pretty!



What do you use as cutting oil?

#4 wendy lee

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:54 AM

What do you use as cutting oil?


I use Novacan cutting oil. 1 bottle lasts quite a long time. I'm not a fan of kerosene....or anything that has a smell for that matter.(-:

#5 DaleK

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 11:09 AM

I have always used cutting oil from my stained glass supplier but a friend of mine uses kerosene.

I also have an oil free cutter that Toyo makes. I use it for small pieces and dichroic glass so I don't have to wash them. It works great. A perfect score every time.

#6 Sandyone

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 12:01 PM

I have always used cutting oil from my stained glass supplier but a friend of mine uses kerosene.

I also have an oil free cutter that Toyo makes. I use it for small pieces and dichroic glass so I don't have to wash them. It works great. A perfect score every time.


We are kerosene dippers.

#7 GAIA

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 04:40 PM

I use light, fine lubricating machine oil, the kind used on bicycle chains, works great and inexpensive.

#8 jackie

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 08:18 PM

[quote name='GAIA' date='08 March 2012 - 05:40 PM' timestamp='1331242811' post='42251']
I use light, fine lubricating machine oil, the kind used on bicycle chains, works great and inexpensive.

My instructors said to use baby oil............

#9 Rebecca

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:11 PM

I don't understand why you would want to use anything besides cutter oil. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Rebecca

#10 Boris_USA

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:30 PM

I don't understand why you would want to use anything besides cutter oil. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Rebecca


Looks like everyone uses different things. I am a WD40 fan myself. I have it on hand, and use it for different things, including my cutters. Any light oil base seems to work well. Kerosene is an old school lube, but it stinks too bad and the smell lingers everywhere, so I dont use it for that reason. I do the small cup trick with a sponge too. When ready to do some cutting, I spray the sponge lightly, and just touch the cutter across the spnge each time. Works for me.

#11 glasstired

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 08:49 AM

Looks like everyone uses different things. I am a WD40 fan myself. I have it on hand, and use it for different things, including my cutters. Any light oil base seems to work well. Kerosene is an old school lube, but it stinks too bad and the smell lingers everywhere, so I dont use it for that reason. I do the small cup trick with a sponge too. When ready to do some cutting, I spary the sponge lightly, and just touch the cutter across the spnge each time. Works for me.


I use all my cutters dry. No need to clean the oil residue off before you foil.
Has worked for me for over 25 years.
Mal

#12 Spudnique

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 03:07 PM

The reason that I'm asking is that I'm just about finished my bottle of Novocam cutting oil and I was wondering if I could use something that was around the house, if someone else had tried and it worked well for them. I have a large bottle of lubricating oil for my pneumatic nail gun, I think that I'm going to give that a try. Seems like it should work, it's a light lubricant. Here goes, nothing? something?
Have a good day, and if anyone else wishes to reply, I'm still interested to see what everyone else is using.
Thanks and happy weekend to all.

#13 glassgunner

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 08:59 PM

I put kerosene on my cereal for breakfast and then just dip the cutter in whatever I didn't finish.

I don't feel so good right now, but my scores are just fine.

#14 Rebecca

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 09:14 PM

I put kerosene on my cereal for breakfast and then just dip the cutter in whatever I didn't finish.

I don't feel so good right now, but my scores are just fine.


:stirthepot:

That's me working on an antidote for you!

Rebecca

#15 malc

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 07:59 AM

I use the Tiki-Torch fuel sold just about everywhere. I think it's kerosene but with the citronella scent. It works well, it's very inexpensive, doesn't smell bad and best of all it makes you want to have a Mai-Tai while your doing your glasswork!

Malc

#16 Spudnique

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 03:35 PM

Too bad I'm a gin & ginger kind of gal!

#17 Stereobob

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 08:31 PM

I use 3 in 1 oil. I like the smell and I always have some around the house.

#18 Stephen Richard

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 03:27 PM

"I've had my cutter run dry once. The score was...not so pretty! "

 

Most of us press too hard on our cutters.  Oil helps to disguise that.  With light pressure, no oil is needed. The pressure required is between 4 to 7 pounds.

Some research has shown that oil helps to keep the score open.  However, as we normally break our glass immediately after scoring, there is no need for keeping the score open for an extended period of time.

Oil helps you see where you have scored - unless, of course, you use enough pressure to create a "scratch" in the glass.  These are the scores that are white with little shards of glass springing up from the score line.

I admit to using oil - so I can see where I have scored, as the amount of pressure required does not leave that white line that is easy to see.



#19 stargazer99

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 05:44 PM

I like using oil too.  Might not be needed but probably keeps the wheel and axle lubed.  The commercial stuff looks just like

automotive anti-freeze, which has a water pump lubricant added.  Been using it and seems to work good.



#20 Knight

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 07:26 AM

I find that the more the glass has texture the easier it cuts with oil, this may just be something I imagine. I use a 3 in 1 oil, or sometimes when I am looking for 3 in 1 I find cutting oil, I don't notice a difference at all. On super smooth glass I use very little oil, on rough surfaced glass I am dipping after every score. I am sure that this is a "habit" that is different with everyone, I am always interested in watching other people cut glass. My way of holding, scoring, running, breaking, and grozing is not the way I see others often. I love to see the personal mannerisms acquired to fit different individuals, there is no right way. As long as it works for you and isn't damaging your tool!






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