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Cutting Oil Alternatives For Toyo Handheld Cutters


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#21 Crackedglass

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 09:14 PM

I'm a rum and coke person myself. Seem to lube pretty good if not overused. Oo..oO



#22 jms

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 11:39 AM

Kerosene is traditional.  It evaporates cleanly and doesn't gum up the cutter.  Back before electric soldering irons, a glazier would use a kerosene lamp to heat the soldering irons, so there was always a supply of kerosene handy in the studio.  I personally don't mind the smell.  It smells like a stained glass studio to me!



#23 serge

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 03:10 PM

For me: Dry. No oil. 

 

Test and compare, then decide!



#24 Boris_USA

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 12:06 AM

I can't handle the smell of kerosene.  I give my cutters a shot of WD40 to lube the wheel, then wipe the excess and cut. Don't want oil on my glass either.  



#25 Knight

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 03:27 PM

I think that oil is not too popular for copper "foilers" because it causes a resist for the foil, leaded "glassers" don't seem to have a problem with the oil.



#26 Tod Beall

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 08:49 AM

I use oil (dipping) to keep the axle clear but don't find any advantage to using it while cutting.



#27 Taj

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 10:18 PM

This is exactly what I was needing to hear (see)! I have a carbide wheel cutter and I am just starting to cut scrap stained glass for my mosaic pieces in addition to using tiles and I had no idea if I needed oil or not. I see that I have room to play. Now all I need to do is find out how going over a scored piece twice hurts the carbide wheel. Love the info!



#28 jms

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 02:37 PM

I read an interesting article years ago about the physics of glass scoring.  It had an illustration that I found enlightening.  I can't seem to locate the article now, but I remember the illustration.

 

When you push down on a cutting wheel and roll it across the glass, the tip of the cutting wheel exerts a huge amount of force (per square inch) straight down.  This actually starts THREE cracks.  The main crack extends straight down into the thickness of the glass.  That is your main score.  In addition, two small cracks are forced sideways just under the surface of the glass.  The material between these two lateral cracks and the top surface of the glass immediately breaks off, and the result is the familiar jagged "score" that is the result of using a glass cutter. 

 

If you are using oil, the oil flows down into the crack.  Apparently if glass is scored and not immediately broken, the glass surfaces begin to "heal" and reattach.  The oil is supposed to do three things:  Dissipate the heat generated as the cutter scores the glass, lubricate the bevel at the end of your glass cutter as it penetrates the surface of the glass.  The oil also flows into the score to prevent the glass from beginning to re-heal.

 

I also want to point out the difference between a score generated by a glass cutter and an ordinary scratch on glass caused by a sharp object.  The two look identical, but the score has a crack at the bottom that extends down into the glass.  A scratch on the surface of a piece of glass does not have that crack extending downwards, and is not vulnerable to breaking along the scratch.

In a practical sense, using oil with your glass cutter results in longer cutter wheel life and easier-to-break scores.  Most amateurs don't put a lot of mileage on their glass cutters, but if you ever find yourself using a strip cutter to make hundreds of feet of scores you will find that keeping the cutter head lubricated makes the head last 2-10 times as long before it gets dull and needs to be replaced.

 

 

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#29 Rebecca

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 11:12 AM

Glass doesn't heal.  That's a myth.  If you have the lateral cracks and chipping along a score, you are putting too much pressure on your cutter.

 

Rebecca



#30 Tod Beall

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 08:27 PM

I'm no scientist, but I've been at this for nearly 40 years. I agree that scored glass doesn't "heal". At least, I've found & broken old scores from my scrap boxes and those of others which I've acquired along the way. And, I don't use oil when cutting, just for keeping the cutter clean & rolling smoothly.



#31 WA2SQQ

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Posted 22 November 2018 - 07:29 PM

I’ve used kerosene for more than 20 years.




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