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Glass Different Thicknesses


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#1 KimberlyAnn

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:39 PM

So I am in my first class and have put together a few practice panels and so far so good. I decided to put together a small panel for a sidelight on the front door that has our address. I am using a green glass that is slightly wavy on one side and an amber glass that is flat. After cutting/grinding, I noticed that the thickness of the green glass is highly variable, sometimes nearly twice as thick as the amber glass - but mostly about 1.5x thickness. will this look awful after I solder? Should I solder the back first so that the front has glass flush? Is this a common problem?

#2 Rebecca

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:46 PM

Don't worry about it. It will be fine.

Rebecca

#3 Ayoakum

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:41 PM

So I am in my first class and have put together a few practice panels and so far so good. I decided to put together a small panel for a sidelight on the front door that has our address. I am using a green glass that is slightly wavy on one side and an amber glass that is flat. After cutting/grinding, I noticed that the thickness of the green glass is highly variable, sometimes nearly twice as thick as the amber glass - but mostly about 1.5x thickness. will this look awful after I solder? Should I solder the back first so that the front has glass flush? Is this a common problem?

You should solder the back first. When you turn if over to solder the front, it will be flush.

Amy

#4 Boris_USA

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 10:58 PM

I would tack the back first also. Things like that are not that noticed, since stained glass work is unique in that sense. People pay attention to the glass and the colors  and tend to ignore anything else, unless its really bad enough to stand out and attract attention. . After looking at a glass window, most people coud not tell you later how it was framed or if there awas any support bars or other non-glass particulars.



#5 TR Biddle

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:06 PM

The issue will become more complex as you add bevels, jewels, globs, etc. to your work, as these are definitely thicker than your standard glass.  Usually, with these, you want the extra thickness on the front, so you must solder front side first.  So, what would you do about variable thickness in the rest of the glass then?  I don't think 1.5 or even 2x variability is worth worrying about.  Just makes the soldering job a little more challenging.  I solder a lot of fused and formed pieces into my work, and these pieces have a lot of depth, like sometimes up to an inch.  I like that my panels aren't flat. I like when people touch my panels just to be sure they aren't really flat. I usually put the extra depth either in front or back, depending on how I want the piece to look, but sometimes I have extra thickness in front AND back, which makes assembly tricky!  






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