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Cutting Lead To Fit A Sharp Angle


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#1 bikeella

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 01:41 PM

what is the best way to cut the lead to cover the point. I actually have a 3 pointy peices coming together and need some help on how to cut the lead to fit. 

Thanks

 



#2 Tod Beall

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 02:17 PM

How sharp an angle?   Do you have good lead dykes???   Just wondering.... You can cut up to about a 45° angle just by tipping the lead a bit and cutting first one face, then the other. The heart may stick out a bit but it should work OK since it will be abutting the empty channel of the next piece.
 
It's almost always best to cut the tricky end of the lead first, get that part right, then cut the other end (which might be easier, but, not always!).
 
For even sharper angles, mark the desired angle on the face of your lead. Cut the lead to length so your blank is about an inch longer than you will ultimately need.
 
Now, reach into the lead with the pointy ends of the dyke's jaws and cut the heart twice: once at the top & once at the bottom, each time as flush with the underside of the face as you can make it. These cuts should be close to the same depth and at least half as long as that mark you made.
 
Now, reach into the lead channel and gently (but firmly) grab the (now liberated) heart in the center with the dykes; begin to gently fold or bend that end of the heart back and forth, weakening and finally breaking it off the rest of the heart. Now, you have your lead "blank" with part of the end where the sharp angle will be cut and the heart will be gone from that end.
 
Using the mark you made earlier and the dykes, cut the angle thru ONE face of the lead. If that looks good, continue but if it needs adjusting, do that now. Then, cut the opposite face on the same angle. BTW: Be sure your dykes are oriented correctly ;- }
 
See? Easy peasy!!
 
You don't want these unsupported, pointy ends to be super long, but that's unlikely. When you go to solder the angle, you can adjust the location & meeting as you need; I suggest supporting the ends so they're the same height above the glass as the rest of the lead. I also suggest doing a few sample cuts on shorter pieces to get the hang of it.

#3 bikeella

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Posted 14 March 2015 - 09:29 AM

Thanks so much for the reply. The angle I was cutting is about 30 degrees which had sharp angle pieces that are adjacent to the middle 30 degree angle and makes even more difficulty. But, to avoid to much complication here ... if it was just the one piece, how would you cut the piece that is abutting the pointy end? I have been using the lead dykes to cut the cut the heart out of the pointy end to cover over the point on the glass.... and then attempt to do what you described on each side of the point. Hope I am not being to difficult to understand what I am trying to do. I am trying to find the best way to neaten things up a bit. Can you upload pictures here so that I could show you the pattern? 



#4 Rebecca

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Posted 14 March 2015 - 03:24 PM

Yes, you can upload pictures.  We would love to see them to better understand your question.

 

Rebecca



#5 John

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 09:47 PM

Older thread revisited:

 

While lead knives & dykes have their place, I have added another option to my hand tools.  It resembles an anvil hand pruner but it has a replaceable razor blade like found in a carpet/utility knife.  Google "edge utility cutter". 

 

It cuts through came with almost no deforming at almost any angle needed.

 

(Sorry I am still not able to upload pix.)






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