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Heavy Or Light?


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#1 Tom Mazanec

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 12:24 PM

I know most training videos say the biggest problem in cutting is pushing to hard, but my instructors (who are really long therm students) say, from the sound, that they think I am pressing too light.

Who would you bet on being right?



#2 Marilyn

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 12:50 PM

I would bet that you are pressing down too lightly.  Can you hear "it" when you are cutting?



#3 Tod Beall

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 02:10 PM

Does the glass break after you score it? Some glasses make virtually no sound but break just fine. Some make a pleasant little zip.



#4 Tom Mazanec

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 03:38 PM

My problem is inside curves. It is very quiet, and these break tangentially, going through the outline and ruining the piece.



#5 Rebecca

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 04:22 PM

That's the way it is, Tom.  Inside curves break that way.  Don't try to score an inside curve and break it all at once.  Score a lot of "clam shells" and break them out a little at a time.  Don't try to use a running plier to break an inside curve.  Instead, use a breaker/grozer to PULL the clam shells out one at a time.

 

Rebecca



#6 Rebecca

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 04:31 PM

I didn't answer your original question.  Almost always, people use too much pressure to cut.  But you could be the exception.  One way to tell is to make a straight cut, break it,  and look at the edge of the glass.  If there are little ripple chips on the edge near the side you cut on, your pressure was fine.  If there are big ripples that go from the side you cut on all the way to the opposite side of the glass, your pressure was too much. 

 

Another thing you can do to "feel" about the right pressure is to put a folded piece of regular computer paper - the stuff you use in your printer - on a hard surface.  Run your cutter across the paper.  If you have about the right pressure you should cut through only the top layer of paper.  When you pick it up, the top layer should separate along your score, but not the bottom layer.

 

Rebecca



#7 annabelle

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Posted 14 April 2015 - 08:38 AM

Thank you for your reply, Rebecca.....As long as I have been teaching, and the classes I have taken to improve my teaching skills, I have never heard your suggestion....I will use this to help my beginners with their cutting pressure...I agree that some glass seems to be "silent" when scored, so sound is not a good indicator of amount of pressure.....practice, practice, practice.....and inside curves always break out better if you take the "little clam shell (I call them half moons)" approach to scoring...



#8 Dr Rex

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 08:24 PM

Thank you annabelle for a wonderful tip!






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