Jump to content


Photo

Stop Before Edge?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Tom Mazanec

Tom Mazanec

    Community Leader

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 269 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Twinsburg, Ohio
  • Interests:Science, technology and science fiction. Furry subculture.

Posted 13 April 2015 - 12:25 PM

In the training videos I have seen, I have heard both "stop a half centimeter from the edge" and "go all the way". Which should I do (keeping in mind that I will probably fall off occasionally anyway)?



#2 Marilyn

Marilyn

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 140 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Kansas

Posted 13 April 2015 - 12:53 PM

I go all the way to the edge with a "lift up" at the edge of the glass so I don't land too hard on my cutting surface ruining my blade.



#3 annabelle

annabelle

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 186 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:North central Florida

Posted 14 April 2015 - 08:40 AM

I always teach to start a finger pad away from the edge of the glass, so you don't keep falling off the edge before you start your score.  Then stop just before you fal of the other edge....Too many hard "landings" with your cutter will damage your cutter wheel..



#4 Transformertester

Transformertester

    Tourist

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 13 February 2016 - 08:58 PM

Okay, so I'm reading this board and perhaps I am missing something. The way that I tend to score my glass, I often "fall-off-of-the-end" and mostly, what has happened is, I take a little chunk out of my glass. My cutting surface is a quarter-inch sheet-of-plywood that I prefer to my cutting table. Currently, I've been using the same cutting head for almost a year.

 

How is it that you guys/ladies are ruining your cutter heads so quickly?

Cutter that I prefer: Diamond Tech Pencil Grip



#5 Tod Beall

Tod Beall

    Daily Mirror Owner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,632 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts just west of Brimfield
  • Interests:Mostly flat glass. I started with sg over 30 years ago. I also collect books about sg. Please visit Beall Glass Studio on Face Book.

Posted 14 February 2016 - 09:43 AM

I agree with Transformer's observations. Falling of the edge onto a surface like plywood seems not to damage my cutter.

When I use a straight edge, I start as close as possible to the far edge and don't worry about dropping of the near edge. I use a traditional-style cutter, so it's important that the grozing teeth are aimed in the direction of travel so the metal doesn't smack down on the glass.

I sometimes cut on my lightbox and occasionally the wheel drops onto the surface which probably isn't good, but I've never noticed any ill effects.

I suspect that impacts might be more damaging to the axel which is a softer metal - that's why it's important to wash the glass bits & dust out regularly with oil or whatever you like.



#6 Knight

Knight

    Community Leader

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 266 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Ohio, US
  • Interests:Art, nature, cooking vegetarian, listening to vinyl, and my Love.

Posted 15 February 2016 - 07:59 AM

I "fall off the edge" every time almost to get an accurate cut/run to the end and my cutters are not suffering. I don't forcefully and aggressively slam my cutter into the plywood table, but it does hit it on occasion. If you are cutting on a flat surface "falling off the edge" shouldn't matter, if you are cutting on a mat that has the "waffle" surface or a "celled" surface to catch shards than I can see your cutter potentially breaking the plastic walls of the waffles/cells. I suggest cutting on a flat surface, plywood or super short indoor/outdoor boat carpet. In the past carpet becomes more a pain with shards and glass getting caught in the nap, plywood just sweeps clean with my bench brush. 

 

I say take it to the edge and don't worry about falling off, if it happens it happens. I have been cutting glass for 18 years and fall off/over it all the time.



#7 Tod Beall

Tod Beall

    Daily Mirror Owner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,632 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts just west of Brimfield
  • Interests:Mostly flat glass. I started with sg over 30 years ago. I also collect books about sg. Please visit Beall Glass Studio on Face Book.

Posted 15 February 2016 - 09:46 AM

I have a suggestion about that plywood work surface. I paint my bench top white. I can mark it as needed - when I set up a cutting or layout jig for example.

Occasionally, I give it a light sanding & another coat of paint. The paint fills most of the small gaps so glass dust & shards are less of a problem.

>>> NEVER wipe your work/cutting surface with your hand!!!!

Have a decent bench brush handy and use it often - I brush debris right into the waste bucket which I hold at the edge of the bench.



#8 stargazer99

stargazer99

    Community Leader

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 467 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Asheville,NC
  • Interests:Retired tool and die maker. Decorative ironwork, German Shepherds, precision machining, stained glass

Posted 15 February 2016 - 10:13 AM

I like to score my glass on a piece of drywall. It provides friction on the glass and I try not to run off the edge, but if I do, it's not damaging to the cutter. Watch you don't get the tapered edge as a surface. Been doing this for years and the drywall lasts a long time. I like to use the Toyo TC-21.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users