Jump to content


Photo

Grinding Tiny Pieces


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Tom Mazanec

Tom Mazanec

    Community Leader

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 269 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Twinsburg, Ohio
  • Interests:Science, technology and science fiction. Furry subculture.

Posted 19 June 2015 - 02:11 PM

One of the eight pieces on my second project is only a fraction of an inch on each side (it is where the trunk joins the head). Is there a trick or special concern for cutting and, especially, grinding such a small piece?



#2 Mt_Top

Mt_Top

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Idaho
  • Interests:Recumbent trikes, lamps, tinkering around homebase.

Posted 19 June 2015 - 05:17 PM

Search Delphiglass.com for "Grinders Tongs" or "Grinders Mate".  Sort of a pair of plastic pliers for holding super small pieces of glass while grinding.  Also, some grinders have different diameter grinding heads (3/4" or 1 inch diameter) and use a plastic table insert that fits that diameter head.  You want to reduce any gap between the plastic table/insert and the grinder head so the tiny piece of glass does not get sucked into the machine and goes off to Never-Never-Land........



#3 Tod Beall

Tod Beall

    Daily Mirror Owner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,632 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts just west of Brimfield
  • Interests:Mostly flat glass. I started with sg over 30 years ago. I also collect books about sg. Please visit Beall Glass Studio on Face Book.

Posted 20 June 2015 - 09:22 AM

Additionally ,another option: I have a 1/4" diameter bit mounted on top of a larger one. I often grind tiny pieces on that because I can get a good grip. I drip a little water on the bit and have at it.

 

However - analyze your designs to look for what may turn out to be problem areas. These include, but are not limited to, "hinges", risky inside curves, lots of points converging, very narrow parts (especially next to beefier ones with joints or bumps) and super-tiny pieces which may largely disappear when foiled. The first consideration is safety, then structure - IMHO.



#4 Tom Mazanec

Tom Mazanec

    Community Leader

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 269 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Twinsburg, Ohio
  • Interests:Science, technology and science fiction. Furry subculture.

Posted 22 June 2015 - 08:34 AM

Actually, I goofed...I took the cutouts home to practice on, saw a line across one and thought I had missed a division. But it was a stick the elephant was holding in its trunk, when I looked at the original.

So I have to recutout that piece. But there will be a lot of tiny pieces on the one I make for her younger sister in a few times, so this is still necessary advice, thanks!






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users