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How To Get Old Style Jewels From Big Chunks Of Glass

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#1 Eric Mauro

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Posted 26 July 2015 - 08:13 PM

Hello everyone!

I have a couple big chunks of glass that I use to try to make some nice jewels. Up to now I've just been banging away at them with various hammers. The resulting pieces that are usable are too big and often show abuse.

I hear there is some kind of diamond rock hammer but haven't been able to scare one up on the web. Any ideas?

 



#2 Boris_USA

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Posted 26 July 2015 - 09:36 PM

Hello everyone!

I have a couple big chunks of glass that I use to try to make some nice jewels. Up to now I've just been banging away at them with various hammers. The resulting pieces that are usable are too big and often show abuse.

I hear there is some kind of diamond rock hammer but haven't been able to scare one up on the web. Any ideas?

 

You might make usable chunks out of them, but not jewels, unless your going to cut facets in them too,  The modern way to do what you want is going to require a diamond saw, to slice and dice your chunks with.  I understand that the old method was to use a sharp wedge and wooden mallet. The wedge was imbedded in a wooden base, and the glass chunk was placed on the wedge where one wanted to have it cleaved, then struck by the mallet to split the place desired.  The wedge looked like a hatchet blade. I would be very cautious in doing any of this, since potential injury could result.



#3 WayneFL

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Posted 27 July 2015 - 04:47 AM

The traditional and modern way of cutting smalti (thick glass for mosaics), marble, granite, etc. is to use a hammer and hardie.  It takes practice but, once mastered, is quick and accurate.   Video showing the use....  http://www.ask.com/y...YwX4r4&qsrc=472



#4 Tod Beall

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Posted 27 July 2015 - 08:34 AM

Great video, Wayne.

 

Eric: If you're starting with large, chunky glass, more spherical than slab-shaped, I think any tool you use will leave a white spot where you hit it. If you look closely at old chunks in windows or lamps, those hit-marks are often visible. I think you may just need to smack away until you get the general size you want.

 

Some folks use wet saws to blank out chunk glass. This may be harder with something that resembles a bowling ball, tho.

 

In stained glass work, slab glass is called "dalle de verre". Tools for chipping slabs into interesting shapes & faceting their edges are available from Blenko in Milton, WV. The modern hammer for working with dalles has a carbide-tipped edge, I believe.

 

The "anvil" can be made from a substantial hunk of T-bar or angle iron. Still, working with a sphere will require some inventiveness!

Have fun & please let us know how it goes. - Tod



#5 MarbleOddityGlass

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 11:13 AM

Hi Eric.
Sounds like a cool project. If you google dalle de verre you can find some good info and pictures.
Here's a link to a you tube video about dalle de verre that is worth watching...

Any chance you can post a picture? I would love to see the glass you're starting out with and the outcome your hammer work. I also make glass jewels although I kiln cast the ones I make and don't get all the amazing chips and facets you can from a hammer.
cheers Jen

#6 Eric Mauro

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 01:50 PM

These are great suggestions thank you! I had no idea what to search under and I was going nowhere.

The hammer and hardie sets pictured are available here: http://www.dimosaico...rs-and-hardies/

There is a smaller chip hammer available from Kokomo: http://www.kog.com/c...ing-hammer.html

I got the chunks travelling through Pennsylvania at the Youghigheny factory, I don't know if you can order them online though: http://www.youghioghenyglass.com

I suppose any glass blower has this kind of stuff left over.

 

I'll post pictures of the big ones. Here's a sample of the chunks I came up with and used:

https://flic.kr/p/wLM3GS



#7 stargazer99

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 05:33 PM

Nice job using the chucks on the rose.  I've built a few lamps using them. I just wrap the chunks in an old towel and put it on some concrete and whack away at it with an old hammer. Make sure to use eye protection. 

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#8 Eric Mauro

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 10:39 PM

That's a cool pattern I like it!

The rose was the only red piece in a giant box at the youghigheney factory.

I got the little hammer from kokomo, it's like a baby hammer though! It still works getting some chips under 1" so far. But yes they go flying.



#9 chaosfred

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 02:44 PM

Wow, the things that never would have occurred to me, simply amazing....





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