Jump to content


Photo

General Optics Question To Collect More Light


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Eric Mauro

Eric Mauro

    Tourist

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Boston

Posted 23 January 2016 - 04:11 PM

I have a weird project that is basically a narrow transom window 4'x9" on one side of a 5" box. The major visible side is on a dark hallway. On the other side is a sunny room that is being doored off. I'm putting the transom over the door.

 

So I would like to collect as much light from the sunny side, transfer that into the box, and have it help light up the nice transom I'm making on the dark side.

 

I have heard of using deck prisms to get light into the under-deck of sailing ships, but that sounds like it just diffuses the light from the flat side, and they are really tall. Maybe some regular prisms would work, but which way should I face them to get the most light in?

 

If I use a lens would it be curved on both sides or flat on the inside to get the most light into the box? Also I don't want some kind of piercing focused light, I want the light to be diffused inside the box. What if I put mirrors on the sides of the box?

 

Thanks for your attention!

Eric

 

Attached Files



#2 Boris_USA

Boris_USA

    Lampman

  • Assistant Administrator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,611 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Shore of Maryland USA
  • Interests:Way too Many...

Posted 23 January 2016 - 05:10 PM

I would caution the use of "Lenses"  in such a project, if exposed to direct sunlight. Focus changes throughout the day, and I know of two cases, where a lens incorporated into a window glass piece set fires.  In one case, curtains where ignited and the other the sofa. The owner came home in time to see the light on his sofa and the cushion smoking.  Had no problem before, but it was the right time of day, and the sun in the right position and angle.



#3 John

John

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 216 posts

Posted 23 January 2016 - 05:45 PM

Boris, Todd & who ever has worked with them:

 

What about the Luxfer prism glass which was recently mentioned in another post?  From what I read, they were designed for simular situations.  However, I have no idea how they were oriented or if used in a double paned manner.



#4 Tod Beall

Tod Beall

    Daily Mirror Owner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,632 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts just west of Brimfield
  • Interests:Mostly flat glass. I started with sg over 30 years ago. I also collect books about sg. Please visit Beall Glass Studio on Face Book.

Posted 24 January 2016 - 10:01 AM

I think the Luxfers would increase the light transmission through the window. Whether it would be noticeable, I cannot say. Also, whether it would be more effective than, say, granite or ripple texture, I don't know.

 

I suggest figuring out a way to test the solutions. If you can't have lots of access to the actual site, maybe you could try to create an analogous setting in your workshop?

 

My guess is that, unless there is direct sunlight on the panel, you will have a hard time evaluating the results. Maybe a light meter would help! Sometimes, we just can't solve all of the site problems we encounter.

 

PS: The Luxfers are somewhat challenging to use. There is a lip around them which barely accepts a tiny lead (or hard metal came). They are twice as heavy as typical sheet glass and have that strong, linear pattern to consider. And they are tough to cut.

But they are cool.



#5 Boris_USA

Boris_USA

    Lampman

  • Assistant Administrator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,611 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Shore of Maryland USA
  • Interests:Way too Many...

Posted 24 January 2016 - 03:53 PM

I think the Luxfers would increase the light transmission through the window. Whether it would be noticeable, I cannot say. Also, whether it would be more effective than, say, granite or ripple texture, I don't know.

 

I suggest figuring out a way to test the solutions. If you can't have lots of access to the actual site, maybe you could try to create an analogous setting in your workshop?

 

My guess is that, unless there is direct sunlight on the panel, you will have a hard time evaluating the results. Maybe a light meter would help! Sometimes, we just can't solve all of the site problems we encounter.

 

PS: The Luxfers are somewhat challenging to use. There is a lip around them which barely accepts a tiny lead (or hard metal came). They are twice as heavy as typical sheet glass and have that strong, linear pattern to consider. And they are tough to cut.

But they are cool.

 

I agree with Tod.  Not knowing the exact conditions of what your attempting, its hard to say which is better, but perhaps Tod has the right idea. A light meter?   There are times when I use a meter to test the percentage of light being transmitted through glass, when trying to match an existing panel in a lamp shade.  My thought would be that the more reflective surfaces (or facets) you have, the more light passes through, like in Granite, or Ice Chip.  Any "Lens" dependent glass is going to concentrate the light to an extent, but its still the same amount of light. A diffusing light make work better.  Also, the big difference will be what kind of light. Direct or Ambient sunlight.  Do some testing.



#6 Eric Mauro

Eric Mauro

    Tourist

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Boston

Posted 24 January 2016 - 08:32 PM

Thanks for the replies. I wondered if it would make a difference too. I will make a little box and see how it works.



#7 Tod Beall

Tod Beall

    Daily Mirror Owner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,632 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts just west of Brimfield
  • Interests:Mostly flat glass. I started with sg over 30 years ago. I also collect books about sg. Please visit Beall Glass Studio on Face Book.

Posted 29 January 2016 - 12:05 PM

Eric:

I just bumped into a fellow who has an interest in the Luxfer tiles and he mentioned that one method used for joining them into panels was "electro-glazing". If you search that term and add Luxfer, you will find some interesting info. Also, you will find info about Luxfer's claim about how the prism-tiles would increase light in a room.

I can't paste stuff here but the on-line wandering may be fun & worthwhile.

Best, Tod



#8 chaosfred

chaosfred

    Homeowner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPip
  • 59 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Oregon

Posted 06 February 2016 - 03:53 AM

Youghiogheny stipple glass transmits light better than most glass does. You could get samples of their lighter/whiter/opal shades and see what light they transmit in your dark corner. The samples they offer are fairly big, 2" x 4". I have used their glass, and it transmits light in amazing ways, kinda crystalline. That's only the stipples I have used, though.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users