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Lead Came For Intricate Designs

lead came intricate

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#1 Corvus

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 11:30 AM

Hey everyone,

 

I have a question. Is there any downside to using lead came for intricate designs? I see a lot of itricate copper foil glass work, but not too many intricate works using came. Why? I'm asking because I'm working on a new pattern design that has a lot of intricate pieces and I don't want to use copper foil for it.

 

Thanks



#2 Marilyn

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 11:41 AM

I would like to know the same thing.



#3 Tod Beall

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 12:30 PM

Lead can theoretically be used for any design you could do with foil. You do need to plan well.

 

You also need patience & good dykes (IMHO). There's no need to use knives today if you don't want to, especially for long, tapering points in small leads.

 

Lead can also be carved to shape, tapered or built up to achieve your desired effects. Additionally, lead overlays can add small detail & enhance the design.

 

Have fun! - Tod

Please be sure to post a photo or several as you progress.



#4 Corvus

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 12:41 PM

Lead can theoretically be used for any design you could do with foil. You do need to plan well.

 

You also need patience & good dykes (IMHO). There's no need to use knives today if you don't want to, especially for long, tapering points in small leads.

 

Lead can also be carved to shape, tapered or built up to achieve your desired effects. Additionally, lead overlays can add small detail & enhance the design.

 

Have fun! - Tod

Please be sure to post a photo or several as you progress.

 

I love the information and explanation you provided!! Very helpful my friend and I will post a photo as a progress!! Thanks again for your time.



#5 Boris_USA

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 10:13 PM

Good post from Tod.  I would add that the size of the panel you intend to make would make a difference to me.  For me, it would need to be over 24x24 for me to consider lead. Under that, foil would be better suited for me, because you can do greater detail and use smaller pieces. When you get into tapering, and shaving lead came, you need a lot of experience and know what your doing at each termination of lead pieces that meet. Just my opinion.



#6 Tod Beall

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Posted 17 September 2016 - 10:00 AM

Boris make some good points there. I don't agree that we should be restricted to his 24" rule; that's obviously personal for him.

 

I think having a pretty clear idea of the effect desired will help make options for construction clearer and experience helps, too! Lead's visual advantage is perfectly parallel edges... consistency. This is helpful in geometric designs, for example.

 

I suggest trying a very simple 6" square with an apple, leaf and four or five background pieces. Draw the organic, tapering, wiggly lines as you wish. Use lead... a small size or two or three, I'd think. Now, try to see how you might taper some leads to enhance the leaf point or make a leaf edge or stem more sinuous than is practical to cut in glass. Try it. See how it goes.

 

One method I've used in planning my leading scheme is to actually draw the intersections full size on the cartoon. For easiest visualization of the glass pieces, I may draw lead lines (cut lines) in the traditional way with two lines, one for each side of the heart. "Little railroad tracks" said some early observer.

Then, I add the edges (sight lines) of the intended leads. This helps me to see how lead joints can be planned for the easiest construction and desired result. I do all this in pencil so I can make as many changes as needed.







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