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Unexpected Deformity In Glass Paint

painting firing mistake

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#1 Glassy McGlassface

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Posted 17 December 2016 - 04:30 PM

untitled2a

hi all

 

so I painted some glass and fired it

 

250c per hour to 450c a ten minute soak there... then 250c to 670c ten minute soak there,  back down to 450c and kiln off, its a very well insulated kiln

 

but certain areas have a deformity, and its hard to describe, so I took a pic and uploaded

 

what's happening here?

 

thanks

j

 

untitled1b

 

 

 

 



#2 Glassy McGlassface

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 02:10 PM

does anyone have an idea of what this is?



#3 Boris_USA

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 04:30 PM

I don't do painted glass, but work with kiln glass a lot, and know very little about painting. Looks to me like the paint may have started to fry, or the glass under it is starting to devitrify Watching to see if anyone knows so I can remeber it. See the thread on here about putty mixing. The book I mentioned is an early 1900s Manual on Stained Glass, and mostly painting. 



#4 Glassy McGlassface

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 09:18 PM

I did go to 670c, seems that, that's a borderline for trouble

 

thanks for your comment sir

 

j



#5 Boris_USA

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 09:24 PM

I did go to 670c, seems that, that's a borderline for trouble

 

thanks for your comment sir

 

j

You might try a slower ramp and hold the temp down to about 1000 F on a test piece. 



#6 Knight

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Posted 20 December 2016 - 03:37 PM

If the paint is too thick it can scale. It is really hard to tell from a photo. When I am firing my black trace lines I put the glass in a cold kiln, ramp it to 1225, crash it to around 700/800 crack the lid and call it a day. With the quick fire kiln, in my studio, the glass is in and out in around an hour. I don't think you need a complicated program to fire the glass, more than likely it is something in the paint or there was something on the glass, uneven paint, paint too thick.....sorry to not have a better answer or a quick fix. Unfortunately, these things can pop up out of nowhere! When I am doing an important piece that can have no imperfect areas I often to two or three at a time in case something happens, that way if I am several layers/firings in I am not all the way back to square one.






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