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Differing Thickness Of Foil


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#1 abales

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 08:10 PM

I have been using different thickness for adding some interest.  Is this common?

 

Right window cap
 
gallery_7709_785_5315538.jpg
 
 
Center window cap
 
gallery_7709_785_7709740.jpg


#2 abales

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 08:13 PM

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#3 GAIA

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Posted 19 February 2017 - 06:20 AM

Lovely work, especially the flower design.



#4 Tod Beall

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Posted 19 February 2017 - 09:49 AM

Good work. Good question.

 

My 2¢:

Stained glass is a sculptural medium and having control (choices) over the line width along with sizes of pieces, color, texture and density is essential to achieve the desired results - whether using lead or foil - or something else!



#5 abales

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Posted 19 February 2017 - 10:43 AM

Thanks I was just curious.  I had seen thicker foil used on the flower stems lines before, stole that for the roses windows.

 

Then I used that for the upper pics lower sections to do something different for those window caps (its a set of 3, with the right one - not done - just a mirror image left one)  These will top 3 very tall windows right even/above the curtain lines for my mom's house.  I was pretty afraid that the curtain rod would create straight line I can't compete with and should not even try.  So I put in the exaggerated zig zag effect in the lower (strong line as well) to counter the straight line of the curtain & rods to hide any misalignment visually across the window panes as they run.  

 

What might you have done to visually?



#6 Mt_Top

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Posted 19 February 2017 - 01:28 PM

Clarification........copper foil comes in 1mil, 1.25mil and 1.5mil thickness, maybe others.  Not sure anyone would notice that you used one or more of these on a project.   BUT, if you are referring to "width" such as 1/4", 3/16", 1/2", etc then yes the wider or thinner width lines are very useful and can add some artistic flare to a project.  I would guess the different width tapes were developed for glass of varying thickness and then the artistic types expanded on that usage.



#7 Tod Beall

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 09:35 AM

I guess I'll add one more comment about this general topic; jump into the deep end, so to speak. So, here's my 2¢ worth.

 

When I see windows like the geometrics abales has posted (which I like), I wonder why they weren't made with lead instead of foil. It's quicker & easier and the lines will automatically be a consistent width. Further, lead provides better support and a cleaner look where long, straight lines are wanted.

 

Of course, foil can have a place in such patterns. One may want the option to create a textured line, for example.



#8 annabelle

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 04:18 PM

Like Mt Top, I assumed (maybe one should not do that often?) that you meant wider vs narrower foil.  Tod makes a point about foil vs lead.  We are all artists, and each of our visions differ from others...Your panels are lovely.....I might be concerned more about hinges in your prairie designs than other aesthetic factors. 



#9 abales

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 08:21 AM

I guess I'll add one more comment about this general topic; jump into the deep end, so to speak. So, here's my 2¢ worth.

 

When I see windows like the geometrics abales has posted (which I like), I wonder why they weren't made with lead instead of foil. It's quicker & easier and the lines will automatically be a consistent width. Further, lead provides better support and a cleaner look where long, straight lines are wanted.

 

Of course, foil can have a place in such patterns. One may want the option to create a textured line, for example.

I never took the lead class!  I just took a pane & foil one and got busy.  Its on the list someday.

 

I am really just simulating lead by getting the biggest foil roll I could find and using that as a "weapons of massive distraction" against the straight lines of the curtain which runs right below these windows.  This is the nice thing about not knowing anything about the hobby or art in general, you have no points of reference and no blinders to what can be done.  Of course the bad thing is your going to recreate every stupid problem pros would just avoid.  Wait until I post some 3d cathedral glass windows!

 

Hinges - I got 3 strong lines running all kinds of zig zag directions in both of those windows.  I hate that stuff.  I did flip those during soldering on thin cardboard out of fear of a bend.  FLW is great but scary. 

 

Thanks for the posts!



#10 annabelle

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 08:47 AM

I was referring to the straight lines made at the colored squares al the way across the top.






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