Jump to content


Photo

Removing Solder


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 camelheights

camelheights

    Tourist

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 19 June 2005 - 06:53 PM

I've gotten back into my stained glass after about 3 years away.
Anyway, I am making 2 sidelight panels for my front door. I put the wrong zinc on while framing and need to remove it, remove the solder that is close to the edge and put the correct zinc on. (I put a smaller zinc on and it doesn't fit properly in the window) Problem......how do you get the solder off that is close to the edge of the panel, the part that I stayed away from till I framed it so it would fit into the zinc properly. Thanks for your help.

#2 Dennis Brady

Dennis Brady

    Curmudgeon

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,081 posts

Posted 19 June 2005 - 07:55 PM

I've gotten back into my stained glass after about 3 years away.
Anyway, I am making 2 sidelight panels for my front door.  I put the wrong zinc on while framing and need to remove it, remove the solder that is close to the edge and put the correct zinc on. (I put a smaller zinc on and it doesn't fit properly in the window) Problem......how do you get the solder off that is close to the edge of the panel, the part that I stayed away from till I framed it so it would fit into the zinc properly.  Thanks for your help.

View Post


Removing zinc
The big problem here is that zinc channel is so stiff that even when you heat it enough to melt the solder, you can't move it away to prevenr the solder from attaching again. Use a small thin metal blade (a putty knife is perfect) to pry up the face of the zinc while you heat it. When the solder has melted away, continue holding the channel face up until the solder sets leaving the channel now unattached. An effective way to get molten solder to set quickly is to blow on it the way you'd blow out a candle. Repeat this on the other side to complete releasing the channel.

Removing excess solder
The most effective way is to hold the panel vertical (up off the work table) and use the iron to melt the solder so it runs down and drops off the panel. If the panel is too large to be held up, you'll have to use the iron to melt and plow the solder off towards the edge.

#3 camelheights

camelheights

    Tourist

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 20 June 2005 - 07:28 PM

Thanks for your response. I thought that was how I would need to do it. I remember there being something that absorbs the hot solder to help remove it. I have something in my stash that I think I purchased for this purpose. It is called No Wick...........or am I incorrect? Thanks again. Nancy

#4 Rebecca

Rebecca

    Chocolatier

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,947 posts
  • Location:Kingsport

Posted 20 June 2005 - 08:59 PM

Thanks for your response.  I thought that was how I would need to do it.  I remember there being something that absorbs the hot solder to help remove it. I have something in my stash that I think I purchased for this purpose.  It is called No Wick...........or am I incorrect?  Thanks again.  Nancy

View Post


The wick stuff will help. Instead of a palette knife, I use a piece cut out of an aluminum can. Solder won't stick to the aluminum and it is very thin. You can heat the zinc and slide the piece of aluminum under the zinc and leave it while you do the other side. The aluminum will get HOT so be sure to use a pair of pliers or popsicle stick to push it between the glass and the zinc.

Rebecca

#5 Dennis Brady

Dennis Brady

    Curmudgeon

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,081 posts

Posted 20 June 2005 - 09:12 PM

The wick stuff will help.  Instead of a palette knife, I use a piece cut out of an aluminum can.  Solder won't stick to the aluminum and it is very thin.  You can heat the zinc and slide the piece of aluminum under the zinc and leave it while you do the other side.  The aluminum will get HOT so be sure to use a pair of pliers or popsicle stick to push it between the glass and the zinc.

Rebecca

View Post


Aluminum will work but be extra careful using it. It melts very easily.

#6 Rebecca

Rebecca

    Chocolatier

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,947 posts
  • Location:Kingsport

Posted 21 June 2005 - 02:33 PM

Aluminum will work but be extra careful using it.  It melts very easily.

View Post


I have never had it melt or even begin to soften.

Rebecca

#7 Guest_Guest_*

Guest_Guest_*
  • Guests

Posted 14 July 2005 - 05:39 AM

I have never had it melt or even begin to soften.

Rebecca

View Post



Neither have I ever had aluminum melt. I use it mainly when doing repairs to get a broken piece out without taking the foil off the surrounding pieces.

#8 Boris_USA

Boris_USA

    Lampman

  • Assistant Administrator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,127 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Shore of Maryland USA
  • Interests:Way too Many...

Posted 14 July 2005 - 11:26 AM

I have never had it melt or even begin to soften.

Rebecca

View Post


Not likely you will have a problem with any soldering being done around it, since Aluminum has to reach 1220 degrees to melt, compared to less than half of that for lead.

#9 Ryan

Ryan

    Tourist

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 28 January 2009 - 09:13 AM

QUOTE (Rebecca @ Jun 20 2005, 08:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The wick stuff will help. Instead of a palette knife, I use a piece cut out of an aluminum can. Solder won't stick to the aluminum and it is very thin. You can heat the zinc and slide the piece of aluminum under the zinc and leave it while you do the other side. The aluminum will get HOT so be sure to use a pair of pliers or popsicle stick to push it between the glass and the zinc.

Rebecca


I have used the solder removal wick for electronics projects when I was younger. Would it not be effective for this application? The reason I ask is my wife was given a finished piece last year that has a couple of cracks in the glass and they will need to be replaced.

#10 Bleedy Pokes

Bleedy Pokes

    Community Leader

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 290 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cincinnati, OH
  • Interests:Shenanigans, mostly.
    Glass, too!
    Sitting on my porch enjoying adult beverages with friends.

Posted 28 January 2009 - 10:08 AM

Hi Ryan,
I've never tried to repair someone else's finished piece, but I have had to repair my own. I didn't have a solder wick, so I let gravity do the work. I just raised the panel with a few pieces of cardboard (making sure it was level) leaving a hole underneath the pieces that needed to be removed and heated up the solder until it started dripping below. I continuously moved the iron to try to prevent over-heating the adjacent glass pieces.

It was a long, tedious process, and a solder wick may help speed it up (but I can't attest to this since I didn't use it). But I was able to use what I all ready had in the house.

Good luck!

#11 Tod Beall

Tod Beall

    Franchise Owner

  • Glasser
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,058 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts just west of Brimfield
  • Interests:Mostly flat glass. I started with sg over 30 years ago. I also collect books about sg.

Posted 28 January 2009 - 11:22 AM

In place of the aluminum (which can heat up real fast) and the steel (which solder can stick to but is stiffer, therefore better than aluminum for the specific case in question), I use old business cards. They are free and work in most cases.

Ordinarily, I'd say let gravity be your helper, but be sure you paid the bill!

http://picayune.ucli...08/ch080714.gif

(Thanks to "Calvin & Hobbes" for the above. You are missed.)

For solder removal, the wicks seem to work for some folks; I've not found them so useful. My fave, after gravity & bull-headed perserverance, is the Soldapult:

http://www.stanleysu...aspx?pn=114-202



#12 Boris_USA

Boris_USA

    Lampman

  • Assistant Administrator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,127 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Shore of Maryland USA
  • Interests:Way too Many...

Posted 28 January 2009 - 07:09 PM

QUOTE (Tod Beall @ Jan 28 2009, 11:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
For solder removal, the wicks seem to work for some folks; I've not found them so useful. My fave, after gravity & bull-headed perserverance, is the Soldapult:


Another cool tool... 8rotfl.gif These things are pretty neat. Nothing worse than having to desolder stuff, especially if it a lot, or in a place where gravity does not want to do the job. Lead free solder is the worst. It does not stay liquid very long, and hardens almost as fast as the iron is moved. Several of my soldering stations have a desoldering gun, that melts the solder and vacums it up in a glass vial, which you can remove and empty. The vacum moter is built into the soldering station. Does not work real well on thick solder or big pieces. Too much heat transfer. Sometimes we have to break out the old standby sure fire tool. The TORCH. With a very fine tip, of course. Thanks for posting the "Solder Sucker" as we used to call it. Have not seen that posted in a glass group yet, as a cool tool.


#13 Guest_strawberryblondie_*

Guest_strawberryblondie_*
  • Guests

Posted 28 January 2009 - 11:15 PM

That is a great tip Rebecca, I had never thought of using pieces of aluminum cans that way. I can say I've learned something new today :)

Linda


QUOTE (Rebecca @ Jun 20 2005, 05:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The wick stuff will help. Instead of a palette knife, I use a piece cut out of an aluminum can. Solder won't stick to the aluminum and it is very thin. You can heat the zinc and slide the piece of aluminum under the zinc and leave it while you do the other side. The aluminum will get HOT so be sure to use a pair of pliers or popsicle stick to push it between the glass and the zinc.

Rebecca






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users